The most accurate way to assess adrenal function is through a saliva cortisol and DHEA biopsy. There are other ways however to assess adrenal function, including through blood tests and through Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis. These methods won’t give you exact cortisol and DHEA values (blood tests can measure the adrenal hormones but saliva hormones are considered far greater due to the fact that saliva hormones are ‘free-fractioned’) but nonetheless they can give you insight into the 2 basic phases of adrenal imbalance: adrenal hyperfunction and adrenal hypofunction.
Adrenal fatigue should not be confused with another medical condition called Addison’s disease where the adrenal glands are not functioning at all. While Addison’s disease is often caused by autoimmunity, Adrenal Fatigue is largely caused by stress along with a host of other factors, like accumulation of toxic exposures, hidden infections, hormone imbalance, or even nutritional deficiencies.
The basic task of your adrenal glands is to rush all your body’s resources into “fight or flight” mode by increasing production of adrenaline and other hormones. When healthy, your adrenals can instantly increase your heart rate and blood pressure, release your energy stores for immediate use, slow your digestion and other secondary functions, and sharpen your senses.
Adrenal Fatigue for Dummies is a book written by Dr. Richard Snyder and nutritionist Wendy Jo Peterson. As the title suggests, this is another in that series of “Dummies” books that are not really written for “dummies” at all. Like others of its kind, this book is written for those who currently have little understanding about the nature of adrenal fatigue – which would include most patients suffering from exhaustion, as well as their attending physicians!
Her brain felt foggy, she was irritable, and she was drinking three cups of coffee a day to get through her afternoon slump. At night she became super mom, cooking and taking care of the kids. Usually she was at her laptop until about midnight, which is when she physically couldn't keep her eyes open. Everything she described was classic for adrenal fatigue, but I wanted to make sure we were on the right track.
Low adrenal function often relates to increase in belly fat with the increase demand of the stress hormone cortisol and glycogenesis to respond to stressful situations and triggering glucose to be released into the bloodstream to provide quick emergency energy. Not only do we have blood sugar handling difficulties, fatigue and depression but we often get thyroid dysfunction and hormone imbalances. The body systems all work together so if one gland as the adrenal glands start to be fatigued or dysfunctional, then the other systems in the body as the hormones and thyroid become impacted.

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Get plenty of sleep: Sleep is the most effective approach to high adrenaline levels. Many women require eight to ten hours of sleep to function optimally. Try to go to bed by ten P.M. Getting to sleep on the earlier side of midnight is much more restorative to your adrenals than sleep that begins later in the night, even if you sleep late the next morning to get in your full amount of sleep.
Sugar and sweeteners: Includes avoiding high-fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners as well. Avoid sugary foods, cereals, candy, sweets, etc. Be aware that sugar is an additive in many breads, condiments and dressings. Try to avoid as much extra sugar as possible. Seek the benefits of raw honey or stevia as an alternative, and always moderate your use of sweeteners of any kind.

To diagnose Adrenal Fatigue correctly requires using a combination of lab testing and feedback from the patient (questionnaires can also play a useful role). On this page I will give a brief summary of the major tests that can be used in an Adrenal Fatigue diagnosis. Dr Wood and I discuss these tests in more detail in The Adrenal Fatigue Solution, along with some revealing tests used by integrative doctors.
Find somewhere quiet, away from distractions. Sit or lie in a position you can maintain comfortably for at least twenty minutes. Close your eyes to help bring on a sense of calm and allow yourself to focus inwards. Release any tension in your shoulders and face. Begin by breathing naturally, focusing on the movement of air in and out of your lungs. Imagine the air moving into your nose and down through your chest, into your lungs and down into your belly.
Dr. George Springer has practiced alternative medicine for 31 years with an emphasis on treating chronic disease conditions. He received his undergraduate BA from the University of Missouri in St. Louis and his Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) from Logan University where he graduated magna cum laude. He went on to receive his Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (N.M.D.) from the American Naturopathic Medical Institute a division of Breyer State University in Los Angeles, California.
My life started to get better when I read this book. Every single improvement in my health over the past six months, and there have been many, have come from putting the advice in this book into action. I can not recommend it highly enough to people who want to do more, but just simply can not summon the energy and are tires of not knowing why they are so tired.
An integrative approach, combining conventional and alternative medicine, is ideal for a condition like Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome. Integrative medicine combines the best of these two disciplines, emphasizing holistic treatment rather than just zeroing in on a single symptom. This means focusing more on things like prevention, diet and lifestyle choices, and less on prescription drugs that simply act as 'band-aids' for your condition.
I was put on HC by my integrative hormonal doctor but after getting the results in early October of a very low cortisol level in the morning, then a very high cortisol level at noon, then a bit low in the evening and then slightly high at night. I was told to take adaptogens by those in the know but I listened to my doctor and now I dread the decision. did I really need to take HC? no amount of HC made me feel better and in fact only raised my blood sugar and pressure. he says I have a maladapted HPA axis from chemotherapy I had in 2009. I have a very high DHEAS and testosterone level too. I want to get off HC but finding it quite difficult. my doctor said the low doses I am on now are only shutting down my own production and I might as well just stop but others have told me just stopping would be very dangerous. I am currently down to 7.5mg (sometimes take 10mg) I am full of anxiety, suffering from shakes/jitters everyday. I was given buspar and klonopin by a shrink who thinks I am nuts. I don’t know what to do but get off and retest cortisol to see if things have changed since October. I have been under enormous stress this past year due to the constant excruciating pain I have to endure from severe sciatica/Spondy from a fall on ice last winter. I also lost my smell and taste (anosmia) that a virus caused and the two created a very stressful period in my life where my adrenals took a huge hit. I don’t know how to get passed this and what to do. I feel AWFUL!!!!! Please HELP!!!!
As the manufacturer of adrenaline, they are the “glands of stress,” but are also the first glands to fail during prolonged or intense periods of stress. The problem with stressors is that they are “cumulative,” in the sense that their impact tends to add up in the body over time until your adrenal glands just can’t take anymore. Adrenal “fatigue” or dysfunction used to be rare, but is now all too common because of our lack of relaxation and other lifestyle factors, such as smoking, sleep deprivation, poor eating habits and excessive caffeine intake, as well as exposure to environmental toxins and allergens.
Another study, released in 2005, found that students diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome had “alterations in adrenal function,” particularly in females, suggesting that their adrenal glands were no longer receiving a normal amount of stimulation. (11) And it’s not just about the amount of sleep you get — researchers at Brandeis University discovered that the quality, rather than the quantity of sleep, affects the body’s normal cortisol responses when exposed to stress. (12)

Some people call the time when the "camel's back" finally breaks a "nervous breakdown." However, nerves really don't break down; adrenal glands do. A "nervous breakdown" is actually adrenal fatigue, or when the adrenal glands can't deal with the amount of stress they're given. Adrenal fatigue used to be rare, but is now all too common because of our lack of relaxation and other lifestyle factors, such as smoking, sleep deprivation, poor eating habits and excessive caffeine intake, as well as allergies.
However, he doesn’t really emphasize animal foods, which I believe are the foundation of a healthy diet (whether it’s eggs, butter, raw milk, grass-fed meat or otherwise). He doesn’t demonize saturated fats, but instead discusses all fats as if they are equal. It’s a step in the right direction, but I think saturated fats are too beneficial to be lumped in with other fats (and here’s four reasons why).

Wilson is very clear which lifestyle habits can lead to adrenal fatigue, which can include lack of sleep, poor diet, constantly driving yourself, unhappy relationships, a stressful work environment, emotional trauma, undesired unemployment, divorce, lack of downtime, and physical trauma (to name a few). Wilson also explains the signs of adrenal fatigue (such as fatigue, depression, inability to handle normal stresses, salt cravings, poor memory and concentration, and decreased productivity) and how it progresses, and why mainstream medicine is slow to recognize adrenal fatigue as a real condition.
The Metabolism Plan: Discover the Foods and Exercises that Work for Your Body to Reduce Inflammation and Drop Pounds Fast is not written specifically for people with adrenal fatigue, however, in this 2017 updated version of her original book The Plan, the author devotes chapters to thyroid function as well as the adrenal/cortisol connection to your body's metabolism, and explains how eating foods that you are reactive to can depress thyroid and adrenal function, as well as prevent you from losing weight. She teaches you not only how to monitor your body for signs of food sensitivities (as in the first book), but also how to assess different styles of exercise, to see if your workouts could be the reason you are not losing weight! This book in my opinion replaces the original verson (you probably don't need to read both, the actual diet is the same) and is at the top of my must-read list for planning your adrenal fatigue recovery!
Adrenal fatigue can be caused by a one-time extreme stress such as a bereavement, or by a prolonged situation such as stress in the workplace. Other factors can also play a role in adrenal fatigue and these include poor diet, insufficient sleep, substance abuse and prolonged situations that leave a person feeling trapped – such as a bad relationship, lack of financial resources and so on. Chronic illness can also reduce the function of the adrenal glands.

To that, all I can say is that adrenal fatigue is something I’ve seen personally. It is my opinion, through years of healthcare practice and supporting scientific evidence, that hypoadrenia is very real and associated with a number of complications. In addition, adrenal fatigue treatment is relatively non-invasive and is beneficial to your health, no matter the diagnosis. Of course, you should be under the care of a qualified medical professional, such as a functional medicine doctor, you trust and see them about any symptoms you experience (of any disease) so that they can determine appropriate treatment.


I have a question. I experienced quite severe adrenal weakness symptoms after gradually increasing DHEA until I was taking 30 mg. a day. I couldn’t even exercise like I always have . I know now that I should have not taken it as I have a history of low blood sugar. I stopped the DHEA entirely and started takiing licorice root caps, 3 caps 3x a day with meals. I feel so much better! My blood pressure was not too low when I started, 120 over 72, but yesterday, it was 137 over 92 with a resting pulse of 66. I am afraid to cut out the licorice, because every time I cut it out entirely in the past, I don’t feel well. Even though I also take a good Adrenal glandular too. Maybe if I cut it down to 2 caps 2 times a day? i wonder if that would lower my blood pressure enough. Btw, I am a 62 year old female in good health otherwise and on no meds.
I am 29 years old and I have had Gastric Bypass Surgery. I have lost 150 lbs since 2013. I have a lot of they symptoms that are described. I have a hard time getting out of bed, mild depression, brain fog, I get lightheaded when I stand up daily. I do drink a lot of caffeine about 2 energy drinks a day for the past 2 1/2 years. I fee like it is the only thing that can give me the energy to function. lately my blood sugar has been all over the place and I feel like I constantly have to snack in order to maintain feeling normal. I am on a Thyroid medication and my Thyroid is normal with that. My periods have been really off lately, I went to my Gyno who just put me on birth control. I want to see about going to an internal medicine doctor who can help me. because I don’t know what to do to feel better.
My doctor suggested I read this book as everyday I am exhausted & struggle to make it to the evening. I have chronic pain as well so it was good to get a scientific understanding of how the adrenals work & how my pain impacts on them & everything else. The book answered a lot of my questions & gave me the courage to say 'NO' to others just a little bit more (that's a journey!). Life is NOT about getting through the day, enjoyment & vitality is so important. The catchphrase 'Thriving NOT surviving" sums this book up! I LOVE it ...
There are also a number of recipes designed to improve both your overall nutrition and your energy levels. For most people, however, the real value of this book – as is true with most “Dummies” books – can be found in its usefulness as a reference guide. Within its pages, there are specific sections on every critical vitamin and mineral, all of the major hormones involved in the adrenal cascade, cellular energy production, exercise fundamentals, and even depression.
I had a horrifically stressful past two years with job changes and a death in the family and identified with the symptoms described above and more. After seeing regular doctors and a psychiatrist, I finally found a naturopath doctor who had me thoroughly tested. My DHEA-S level was below normal range and the 4x/day saliva test showed my cortisol level dropping over 90% from the mid-range of normal in the morning to the very bottom of the range by noon and lower the rest of the day. She called the pattern “flat lining.” So this is clearly not normal, but it’s also not a “recognized condition”? I’ve been taking two thyroid medications for nearly 30 years – including Armour Thyroid, which most doctors don’t know how to prescribe – and have now added an adrenal supplement. Once we got the right dosage I started to feel better within a few days. I can finally sleep and have more energy throughout the day. I don’t care if you think adrenal fatigue doesn’t exist. I am proof that it does, and that it can be treated.
Because so much of adrenal fatigue is really brain-based, most of the natural medicines I use focus on supporting optimal brain health and the brain’s response to stress. Explore blends of adaptogenic herbs like ashwagandha, eleuthero ginseng, holy basil, and rhodiola rosea to give your adrenal axis some TLC. I also incorporated phosphatidylserine supplements into my routine. (Of course, consult your doctor before implementing any herbs or supplements.)
Stress can have devastating effects on health. Even if you do everything else right health-wise, if you don’t manage your stress, none of it will mean much. During my healing journey I practiced mindfulness meditation and other stress-busting strategies to bring mindfulness into my day, like taking time-outs for slow, deep breathing. This is a simple way to defuse stress levels and calm the brain-adrenal axis. I’m also a big fan of listening to Eckhart Tolle audiobooks when I’m in the car.
Get plenty of sleep: Sleep is the most effective approach to high adrenaline levels. Many women require eight to ten hours of sleep to function optimally. Try to go to bed by ten P.M. Getting to sleep on the earlier side of midnight is much more restorative to your adrenals than sleep that begins later in the night, even if you sleep late the next morning to get in your full amount of sleep.
I have been in a similar situation regarding pain. Three years of not sitting and feeling like my back and legs are on fire. What is turning my life around is a book I just finished called, “The Great Pain Deception ” by Steve Orzanish. It makes clear how stress and pain work together which alters the entire body chemistry. The supplements can help, The 27years of pain, stress, and suffering that the author of this book experienced is dramatic. He thought he could never heal. He did, and shares his journey out of stress suffering and pain and clearly shows those that are willing how they can find their way to healing. There is a way to get back in balance.
Adrenal fatigue can affect blood sugar and sugar metabolism as stress normally causes the adrenal glands to produce more cortisol, which helps raise blood sugar levels so the cells can more glucose to generate energy for your response to the stressor. The elevated blood sugar, in turn, requires higher levels of insulin to get the glucose from the blood into the cells. When this cycle is repeated frequently, the cells may become insulin resistant to protect themselves from too much glucose, especially when no energy-consuming physical action is taken in response to the stress. The greater the insulin resistance, the more insulin it takes to get glucose into the cells. In this way, chronic or repeated stress can contribute to persistent insulin resistance, and the resulting high levels of glucose (hyperglycemia) and insulin circulating in the blood that are likely precursors to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

To assess adrenal function, we conduct a one-hour ACTH stimulation test, which is very safe and reliable. We also look for thyroid issues and diabetes. After checking for a variety of endocrine disorders using testing and symptom assessment, we start working with a multidisciplinary team of doctors to figure out the root cause of the patient’s problem.
Hello, thank you for writing this post. Last year, I suffered from extreme adrenal fatigue (I had to sleep at least 13 h a day for over two months, not to mention nausea, shakiness and other symptoms) and, to be honest, I still feel the results of exhausting my organism almost to the breaking point. I am very glad you wrote this post as I believe it is important that people know about this health issue and not undermine its meaning on their health and wellness.
Misdiagnosed: The Adrenal Fatigue Link was released in 2014 by Dr. Steven Zodkoy, a nutritionist and chiropractor who has spent years treating patients who had been told that their conditions were either unexplainable or untreatable using conventional medicine. In this book, written with the average patient in mind, Dr. Zodkoy attempts to better explain the phenomenon of adrenal fatigue in layman’s terms, and offer a recovery regimen to aid in overcoming this syndrome.
One of the most commonly overlooked causes of Adrenal Fatigue is intestinal infections that gives rise to an inflammatory response. Such infection can occur sub-clinically with no obvious signs at all. Infections in the gut, including giardia, SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth), fungal dysbiosis, and h. pylori infection are just a few that may contribute to adrenal dysfunction.
A: Real adrenal insufficiency describes adrenal glands that are sick and unable to function properly. Adrenal insufficiency can be caused by Addison’s disease, a pituitary disorder or another disorder. Symptoms of this life-threatening dysfunction include extreme exhaustion, lack of appetite (leading to weight loss), diarrhea, nausea and low blood pressure.
The first question to ask is what stage the individual has reached. If he or she is still on Stage 1 or 2 Adrenal Fatigue, where cortisol levels are still high, then a recovery may take very little time. If the condition is caused by temporary stress at work or bereavement, we can reasonably expect cortisol levels to return to normal once the stress has passed. In fact, many of us enter Stage 1 or 2 Adrenal Fatigue multiple times during our lives, only to pass out of it within a few months as the underlying cause disappears.
Dr. Wilson also delves into the types of people and personalities who are commonly afflicted with this syndrome. He explains how different professions can leave certain people vulnerable to the type of stress that can overload their adrenals and result in this syndrome. Included also are examinations of how certain diseases have an adrenal component that can lead to adrenal exhaustion.
Do you feel that your energy levels are just at a permanently lower level than they used to be? Aging is often a factor in this, but chronic stress can be a major contributor to exhaustion too. If you’re one of those people who find themselves drinking more and more coffee just to get through the day, it might be time to look at the underlying cause behind your tiredness.
Dr James Wilson is the world’s authority on the stress syndrome known as adrenal fatigue. His book Adrenal Fatigue: the 21st Century Stress Syndrome is a commitment to the truth in defining and treating this well-known but poorly understood malady. Adrenal fatigue is not recognized by allopathic medicine or by the insurance or pharmaceutical industries in the United States. There is no International Classification of Diseases coding for adrenal fatigue. Some patients have a diagnosis of the extreme forms of adrenal stress known as Addison disease or Cushing disease. Where allopathic medicine falls short, naturopathic medicine steps up to the plate to shine, outweighing the possibilities for success: “there are no magic pills for adrenal fatigue but there are certainly key lifestyle changes and nutritional supplements that will greatly facilitate your recovery” (p 97).
A 2 was all I have in cortisol which is way below minimum range of 8. Probably fried adrenal and Addison. I will be taking prednisone and dhea for the rest of my life. Probably all my gastro issues and cvid disorder are all connected. I can tell you that my spiritual background and training in alternative healing are worthless to fight this condition
By purchasing "Adrenal Fatigue" you will be able to gain relief from the turmoil and restore your body into a state of calmness with a pervading sense of ease and clarity to soothe your mind and body. Not only that but with this step by step guide you will have a clear understanding of how the adrenal glands function when they are fresh and rejuvenated. You may not believe it now but by letting go and relaxing inside you can give your body the deep rest and cleanse that it needs. Living more harmoniously and in a tranquil state is a solution available to you by following this book.”

Christine R. says…"If you are interested in learning about adrenal fatigue and to find out if you have it, I highly recommend The Adrenal Fatigue Solution by Fawne Hansen and Dr. Eric Wood. It is an excellent, thorough book about this widespread condition that doctors just aren't treating. This book shows you how to heal your adrenal fatigue for good."


The problem is that stimulants tend to lose their effectiveness over time. As chronic stress takes its toll on your endocrine system, each cup of coffee or sugary snack gives you less of an energy boost. Caffeine can prevent you from getting a good sleep too. The more stressed and tired you become, the more stimulants you need. This vicious cycle is how many people unwittingly accelerate their decline into hormonal dysregulation and extreme fatigue.
This is a doctor who specializes in both Western and Eastern medicine and thus combines a holistic approach with potential medications. I believe that this type of physician is best equipped to handle adrenal fatigue. You can also consider a functional medicine physician, which is a doctor trained to look at the body as a whole with an emphasis on searching for the underlying cause of your health deterioration rather than the symptoms.
The diagnosis of Cushing syndrome (CS) requires evidence of cortisol hypersecretion. While serum cortisol levels fluctuate unpredictably and are strongly dependent on concurrent cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) levels, a 24-hour urine specimen integrates the cortisol production for an entire day and is not affected by CBG. Urinary cortisol reflects the portion of serum-free cortisol filtered by the kidney, and correlates well with cortisol secretion rate.
I am 29 years old and I have had Gastric Bypass Surgery. I have lost 150 lbs since 2013. I have a lot of they symptoms that are described. I have a hard time getting out of bed, mild depression, brain fog, I get lightheaded when I stand up daily. I do drink a lot of caffeine about 2 energy drinks a day for the past 2 1/2 years. I fee like it is the only thing that can give me the energy to function. lately my blood sugar has been all over the place and I feel like I constantly have to snack in order to maintain feeling normal. I am on a Thyroid medication and my Thyroid is normal with that. My periods have been really off lately, I went to my Gyno who just put me on birth control. I want to see about going to an internal medicine doctor who can help me. because I don’t know what to do to feel better.

Thank you for sharing your recovery process for your adrenals! This spring I began the journey to find remove things from my diet that irritated my adrenals, causing them to ‘crash’. In my search for healing, I found your article and it’s so encouraging! I do have a few questions though…. is the reason for fat bombs to give the adrenals rest from needing to help create energy (by eating ‘sugar’ multiple times an hour? and after they’re back to normal, the fat bombs won’t be necessary?

But this sudden onset of foggy brain become chronic for the last 3 years. Visited multiple doctors. Took Brain MRI, Multiple blood test, Vitamin B12 went down and had shots to recover, no kidney issues. All the blood test came back fine. Tried Yoga and meditation but no use. Insomnia & also sometimes sleeping more. Got many food allergies like Gluten and Dairy products. Tried sports & other exercises but no recovery. When i wake up in the morning i feel like i did not sleep and have the sensation of lightheadedness.

Do you find that the slightest amount of stress leaves you feeling overwhelmed? Adrenal Fatigue sufferers often have a difficult time dealing with physical or emotional stress. This is for exactly the same reasons that are behind that unrelenting feeling of tiredness. It all comes back to the low hormone levels associated with late-stage adrenal exhaustion.


Interpreting the results correctly can be difficult for a physician without experience of Adrenal Fatigue. The reference ranges supplied by labs are so wide that they only flag up extremely low cortisol levels. So your doctor will need to look at the levels provided and make his or her own judgment. This is where the importance of using an optimal range, rather than the reference range, becomes clear.
Addressing one stressor at a time is generally the best way to approach this. Identifying what makes you happy and what stresses you is the easy part, then begins the difficult part of making the changes that you need to make. This will often require a significant adjustment in outlook. For example, if a high-paying job is damaging your health, can you step off the corporate ladder and return to a simpler, more fulfilling life? And if a relationship has been causing you emotional stress for years, do you have the courage to pull the plug and start again? All these are issues that can hopefully be addressed with the support of family, friends and perhaps even a good therapist too.

I first learned about cytokines years ago when I was dealing with Lyme. What many of us do not realize is that the stress response triggers inflammatory immune cells called Cytokines. These cytokines perform many jobs and one of them is to make your thyroid receptors less sensitive to thyroid hormones- meaning that you’ll need more thyroid hormone that usual to have the same impact! This is where things get tricky because your thyroid blood work (see Part I for the blood work labs to get), can come out perfect but you’ll still be seeing thyroid symptoms because if you’ve got thyroid resistance, you can have the correct levels of thyroid hormone in your blood but your cells are being deprived. Yikes, right? Your hormone in your blood is not getting into your cells where you need it so you’re not seeing an improvement in your symptoms and your blood work can look perfect.

So what does this mean for Adrenal Fatigue sufferers? It depends on which stage of the condition you have reached. In the early stages, consistently high levels of cortisol suppress your immune response and leave you vulnerable to infection. In the later stages of Adrenal Fatigue, low levels of cortisol can lead to chronic inflammation, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Neither is a good outcome, and so your Adrenal Fatigue treatment should focus on restoring cortisol to a sustainable, balanced level.

Low adrenal hormone levels may also be linked to low blood sugar. Normally, cortisol works to maintain blood sugar levels throughout the day, but low cortisol levels may not be sufficient to sustain blood glucose. When blood sugar levels drop, sleep is disrupted, which can cause you to wake earlier than normal – for example, between 1-3am. Eating a small, healthy snack before bedtime may help to combat this. Choose foods that are low in sugar and high in protein and/or healthy fats in order to help stabilize blood sugar without spiking it.


The effectiveness of this multi-system treatment was further confirmed through the analysis of the cumulative findings of over 40 independent physicians and over 5,000 patients. Prior to the treatment at the Holtorf Medical Group, the patients had seen an average of 7.2 different physicians for the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia without significant improvement.
Unfortunately, many individuals and physicians continue to deny that this syndrome is a legitimate disease. The medical literature is, however, very clear in proving the opposite; individuals with this disorder have measurable hypothalamic, pituitary, immune and coagulation dysfunction. These abnormalities then result in a cascade of further abnormalities, in which stress plays a role by suppressing immunity and hypothalamic-pituitary function.
Supporters of adrenal fatigue believe the problem begins when many different life stresses become too much for the body to handle. Our adrenal glands—small organs located above the kidneys—usually deal with stress by producing hormones like cortisol. According to the theory of adrenal fatigue, when people are faced with long-term stress, their adrenal glands cannot keep up with the body’s need for these hormones. When this happens, symptoms of “adrenal fatigue” may appear.
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