Dr James Wilson is the world’s authority on the stress syndrome known as adrenal fatigue. His book Adrenal Fatigue: the 21st Century Stress Syndrome is a commitment to the truth in defining and treating this well-known but poorly understood malady. Adrenal fatigue is not recognized by allopathic medicine or by the insurance or pharmaceutical industries in the United States. There is no International Classification of Diseases coding for adrenal fatigue. Some patients have a diagnosis of the extreme forms of adrenal stress known as Addison disease or Cushing disease. Where allopathic medicine falls short, naturopathic medicine steps up to the plate to shine, outweighing the possibilities for success: “there are no magic pills for adrenal fatigue but there are certainly key lifestyle changes and nutritional supplements that will greatly facilitate your recovery” (p 97).

My 21 year old son has been diagnosed with”idiopathic hypersomulence” after a sleep study showing no apnea or narcolepsy. He lived in a house that had several feet of water in the basement and had black mold on the windowsills of his bedroom. He’s living with us now, but he is so tired all of the time! On weekends, he’ll sleep til 4 p.m.He will sometimes come in from work and lay on the floor from exhaustion. I desperately want to help him. He does have tonsil stones and we’ve scheduled a tonsillectomy. I don’t know if it will help or hurt, going through a surgery. If you can give ANY direction, I would be very grateful!
The most accurate way to assess adrenal function is through a saliva cortisol and DHEA biopsy. There are other ways however to assess adrenal function, including through blood tests and through Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis. These methods won’t give you exact cortisol and DHEA values (blood tests can measure the adrenal hormones but saliva hormones are considered far greater due to the fact that saliva hormones are ‘free-fractioned’) but nonetheless they can give you insight into the 2 basic phases of adrenal imbalance: adrenal hyperfunction and adrenal hypofunction.
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After read this book I found that you could probably are dealing with the adrenal fatigue symptoms and you may not knowing, been tired, living with stress or having anxiety could be by this reason, here you can find the root cause and ways to test if you are dealing this this fatigue syndrome, one of the principal rules is to change your diet where you can find many solutions here.
I was put on HC by my integrative hormonal doctor but after getting the results in early October of a very low cortisol level in the morning, then a very high cortisol level at noon, then a bit low in the evening and then slightly high at night. I was told to take adaptogens by those in the know but I listened to my doctor and now I dread the decision. did I really need to take HC? no amount of HC made me feel better and in fact only raised my blood sugar and pressure. he says I have a maladapted HPA axis from chemotherapy I had in 2009. I have a very high DHEAS and testosterone level too. I want to get off HC but finding it quite difficult. my doctor said the low doses I am on now are only shutting down my own production and I might as well just stop but others have told me just stopping would be very dangerous. I am currently down to 7.5mg (sometimes take 10mg) I am full of anxiety, suffering from shakes/jitters everyday. I was given buspar and klonopin by a shrink who thinks I am nuts. I don’t know what to do but get off and retest cortisol to see if things have changed since October. I have been under enormous stress this past year due to the constant excruciating pain I have to endure from severe sciatica/Spondy from a fall on ice last winter. I also lost my smell and taste (anosmia) that a virus caused and the two created a very stressful period in my life where my adrenals took a huge hit. I don’t know how to get passed this and what to do. I feel AWFUL!!!!! Please HELP!!!!
Debi please look up General Adaptation Syndrome. Back in 1936 it was entered into the medical literature and encompasses what the chiropractor tried to define and then some – there was no need to reinvent the wheel, but sadly the work is no longer well known. The man (Dr Hans Selye) who did the studies and defined the syndrome also appropriated the word “stress” from physics and it entered into medical vernacular as a result. Most of what we know of the stress response and the effects of stress is based upon the foundation of his work (as is our understanding of adrenal hormones). The bottom line is that by whatever name, adrenal insufficiency is real, it’s been very well defined and mapped and virtually undisputed since 1936, just not called by its proper medical name: General Adaptation Syndrome. It’s a syndrome because it’s a cluster of symptoms; it’s not a disease as is Addison’s.
What's to know about pheochromocytoma? Pheochromocytoma is a rare, potentially life-threatening tumor of the gland in the body that produces adrenalin. In this article, learn about the symptoms of pheochromocytoma and their potential complications, as well as the function and anatomy of the adrenal gland. Read on to find out about outlook with the tumor. Read now
It is the observation of these scientists that suboptimal health, as an “in-between” status before disease, is a precursor to many health conditions and has been exacerbated by the culture shifts in the last several decades like Western lifestyle habits, pollution, poor diet and tobacco use. This study, intended to expand over subsequent years by large numbers, is an effort to legitimize some of the oft-ignored benefits of Traditional Chinese Medicine. (15)
This not at all how Addison’s is dianosed. Addison’s testing usually entails an 8 am cortisol draw at a lab. They will also usually conduct an ACTH stim test to confirm. I hope you made it to an endo. They will not diagnose you with adrenal fatigue as there is no such diagnosis, and thus, no such diagnosis code. Your insurance company will not recognise adrenal fatigue either.
Carmen there is hope, I was on prednisone for more that 5 years straight, it was a long, awful, painful, and slow withdrawal from it. this was about a year and a half ago, i’ve had to do short bursts about 4 times since then, I like to breathe. At that time I also got off of high doses of morphine another withdrawal that was not pretty, I was put on methadone as i have chronic pain issues. After this time I started investigating herbs that might help me, and i have found a wealth of information on not just herbs, but on many other natural ways to heal, and I’m actually starting to feel better than I can ever remember and I’m 53, with 6 children, 7 grandchildren 3 of which I have been Mom to for the last year and a half.
I’ve just started taking Siberian Ginseng (in drop form) and just after the first dose, it had an immediate effect and I started to lose the water I had been retaining and I’m not feeling so “dead” in the mornings. I understand it’s best to take it for up to 3 weeks and then have a break from it. I’ll try 2 weeks and 2 weeks off maybe and see how that goes. I’m also using Natural Progesterone cream (morning and evening) – Emerita is the make – as well as other things but definitely noticed a huge different with the Ginseng. I shall continue.
Fish oil (EPA/DHA): There are a large number of benefits of supplementing with fish oil (or, for people on vegan or other plant-based diets, algal oil). Several of these include counteracting a number of adrenal fatigue-related symptoms and complications, such as diabetes, mental dysfunction, arthritis, immune system function, skin issues, weight gain and anxiety/depression.
I dealt with adrenal fatigue before I developed Bulletproof. It was hard to figure out what was wrong because a lot of doctors didn’t (and still don’t) recognize adrenal fatigue as real. One big reason is that when your stress response is messed up, it affects so many parts of your biology that it’s hard to identify as adrenal fatigue, and even harder to study.
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