This book was very informative and a very practical guide for people wanting to take action to improve the condition of adrenal fatigue. Very helpful about other related health conditions. Covered every aspect from a very good self assessment, explanation and impact of the condition, and the ways in which people can make changes to assist themselves. My health has certainly improved since applying the principles and practical help.
In her book, this Certified Nutrition Specialist presents her central premise that the brain – not the adrenals – bears the most responsibility for what we commonly view as adrenal fatigue. Like Dr. James Wilson, Gedgaudas uses much of Hans Selye’s pioneering research into stress and our response to stressors as a starting point for her work. Unlike Wilson, however, she turns her attention almost completely away from the adrenal glands and toward the patient’s brain. In her view, it is the brain that is most at risk in our modern world, and it is the impact of stress on the brain that is at the root of most of modern man’s fatigue issues.
Methylation labs: Methylation is a massive biochemical superhighway that happens 1 billion times every second in the human body. It makes a healthy brain, gut, hormones, and detox pathways and protects your DNA. All super important stuff. Genes that make methylation happen can be mutated in some of us. This decreases methylation and can cause a variety of health issues. I had multiple methylation gene mutations, one of which is the MTHFR gene.
This group of vitamins is the first step in getting your mind and body back into gear. B vitamins work together in helping the body create energy from the food you eat, while also supporting brain function and healthy skin, hair and muscles. Although the role of each B vitamin differs slightly, they’re all vital for a healthy metabolism and energy production.
The effects of adrenal dysfunction can be profound: fatigue and weakness, suppression of the immune system, muscle and bone loss, moodiness or depression, hormonal imbalance, skin problems, autoimmune disorders, and dozens of other symptoms. The good news is that adrenal fatigue can almost always be relieved. Let’s look at the relationships between stress, high cortisol levels and adrenal fatigue, and then we’ll look at how you can give your adrenals more support.
Studies in mice have shown that magnesium modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), helping to reduce anxiety and stress. In this way, it’s believed that magnesium can regulate the production of cortisol and prevent excess cortisol from being created. This ultimately helps to keep the nervous system in check, allowing the mind and body to feel more relaxed.

Robin Berzin MD is a functional medicine physician and the founder of Parsley Health. Her mission is to make functional medicine affordable and modern, so that more people can access this holistic, root-cause approach to health. A Summa Cum Laude graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Robin went to medical school at Columbia University and later trained in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. She is also a certified yoga instructor and a meditation teacher, and has formally studied Ayurveda. Robin writes for a number of leading wellness sites, and speaks regularly for organizations including the Clinton Foundation, Health 2.0, Summit, and the Functional Forum, on how we can reinvent health care. She's also an mindbodygreen courses instructor, teaching her Stress Solution program designed to help you tune down the stress in your life and tune up your energy and happiness.


The adrenal glands, which sit on top of your kidneys like little kidney baseball caps, release several important hormones, one of which is cortisol. You've probably heard about cortisol before since it's your major stress hormone. Cortisol is supposed to be higher in the morning when you wake up and slowly go down throughout the day so that you can sleep well. It's not necessarily a bad guy—it actually helps regulate your blood sugar and pressure—but you want cortisol to be in balance. Not too high and not too low.
A: After ruling out possible endocrine disorders, your endocrinologist can refer you to other specialists, including urologists, cardiologists, rheumatologists, allergists/immunologists and infectious disease physicians. If you’re diagnosed with POTS or another disorder, these specialists will work together to manage your health and develop a targeted treatment plan — putting you on the path to symptom relief.

I found your site by searching again,,,,for the umpteenth time in 2 years I have found you…..Being in health care I am very aware of the anatomy and physiology of the body. (was my fav subject) I went back to confirm what my education has taught me….after being diagnosed with a Blanket Version of Dysautomia…..To make a long story short,,,my cardio was lazy and I fired him and found out I had a rare disease called MALS. Median Acruate Ligament Syndrome..I had lap surgery that helped immensely…After being hurt on the job, being considered disabled, lost my job, fiancé of 10 years suddenly died at 50, Brother being on life support after being hit head on by a drunk driver and taking care him for nine months, three heart attacks for me,,,,,,all this in 6 years…I am pretty stressed out….:) I noticed that any emotion good or bad raises my BP, adrenaline surges and even my hair will stand up on my body. Confirmed that the adrenal surges cause the latter….BP is all over the place…my new cardio is in favor of HRT…she believes females need them and the case study was too short and inconsistent….What do YOU suggest? I am a vitamin junkie,,,,thyroid, cortisol, levels are supposedly fine…..I have also read that the hypothalamus and amygdala is a factor the HPA axis…..thoughts? I greatly appreciate your time…..S.W.


Treatments for adrenal fatigue vary from using certain botanical medicines - which certainly will always play a major role, to using intravenous vitamin therapy. Usually this combination very quickly delivers results that both address the symptoms and nourish your adrenals back to optimal function. Additionally, patients usually need some blood sugar support and dietary changes to support stabilizing and decreasing insulin resistance while healing the adrenal glands.
Did you ever complete additional follow-up articles in addition to this one? I’ve been dealing with similar issues and performed the iris contraction test and experienced non-stop wavering. I reached out to my endocrinologist and she informed me that adrenal fatigue is not a medical diagnose and does not exist int he medical world. I’ve had thyroid tests done and all came back normal, yet I still have symptoms. Thanks!

Adrenals. Ahhhhhhh, how I wish I knew about these guys a decade ago before my doctor put me on steroids in my 20’s, which took away my pain but also destroyed my adrenals!!! It’s taken me over 10 years to build back my adrenals. So much fun. Let me tell you. This has become part of my life so I love learning new ways to heal myself and my adrenals have been anything but easy to heal. They’re tricky and they’re exhausting and you end up feeling depleted, tired and fed up most of the time. When I learned about adrenal fatigue treatment from my Functional/Integrative M.D.’s I was amazed at all the knowledge I found on how I could start to heal these babies, which were KEY for my thyroid health. You’ll never have an optimal thyroid if your adrenals are out of whack. So, let’s talk about what adrenals are and how you can make sure they’re in tip-top shape. As Susan Blum, M.D. (she was my 1st Functional MD) mentions in this article for Well&Good, 8 Signs You Have Adrenal Fatigue, “When there’s severe, chronic stress, the adrenal glands can stay in the ‘on’ position, making extra amounts of these stress hormones.”
Naturally, there is a good deal of advice on caring for your brain with nutrition and supplements. There are also a few sections on cortisol’s impact on health at both high and low levels of the hormone. As you might expect from someone who is an expert on neurofeedback, there is also a chapter devoted to that therapy, as well as other holistic and technology-based therapies that can help to reorient your brain to improve your natural stress response. Finally, there is a section offering insight into mitochondrial function that can help many patients to understand just how energy conversion actually happens within the body.
Every challenge to the mind and body creates a demand on the adrenal glands. And the list of challenges is endless: lack of sleep, a demanding boss, the threat of losing your job, financial pressures, personality conflicts, yo-yo dieting, relationship turmoil, death or illness of a loved one, skipping meals, reliance on stimulants like caffeine and carbs, digestive problems, over-exercise, illness or infection, unresolved emotional issues from our past or present and more. The result is adrenal glands that are constantly on high alert.
The Everything Guide to Adrenal Fatigue: Revive Energy, Boost Immunity, and Improve Concentration for a Happy, Stress-free Life promises that you can regain optimal health by reorienting your diet and lifestyle. The book’s author, Dr. Maggie Luther, is a naturopathic doctor and holistic practitioner who has spend more than a decade treating the fatigue that occurs due to distressed adrenals. Dr. Luther’s focus is on helping patient to care for themselves using balanced lifestyle techniques.
Adrenal fatigue is a collection of signs and symptoms, known as a syndrome, that results when the adrenal glands function below the necessary level. Most commonly associated with intense or prolonged stress, it can also arise during or after acute or chronic infections, especially respiratory infections such as influenza, bronchitis or pneumonia. As the name suggests, its paramount symptom is fatigue that is not relieved by sleep but it is not a readily identifiable entity like measles or a growth on the end of your finger.
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