The Adrenal Fatigue Solution contains everything you need to start treating your Adrenal Fatigue. We have included lots of information on the lifestyle changes that you should be making, along with complete lists of the vitamins, minerals and supplements that you should be discussing with your doctor. The eBook is written in simple, easy-to-understand terms, and is the perfect starting point for your treatment.
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The website of chiropractor and naturopath James L. Wilson, DC, ND, PhD, says that he coined the term adrenal fatigue in 1998 “to identify below optimal adrenal function resulting from stress and distinguish it from Addison’s disease.” As many other naturopaths have taken up the diagnosis, it has spread widely across the Internet. Wilson’s website notes that “conventional medicine does not yet recognize it as a distinct syndrome.”
The adrenals are two small glands that sit on top of the kidneys and produce several hormones, among them, cortisol. When under stress, we produce and release short bursts of cortisol into the bloodstream. The adrenal fatigue theory suggests that prolonged exposure to stress could drain the adrenals leading to a low cortisol state. The adrenal depletion would cause brain fog, low energy, depressive mood, salt and sweet cravings, lightheadedness, and other vague symptoms.
The idea underlying the condition is that constant stress puts an undue burden on the adrenal glands to produce hormones — especially cortisol — and the glands burn out. The lack of adrenal hormones leads to a host of generalized symptoms, including tiredness, trouble falling asleep or waking up, and a need for stimulants like caffeine to get through the day. With the fast-paced demands of modern life making many people feel consistently stressed out and sleep-deprived, it’s easy to understand the appeal of a diagnosis that promises an explanation — and treatment to counteract their feelings of fatigue.
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The book is divided into 4 parts that are arranged sequentially so that each section prepares the reader for the successive readings. Part 1 is an overview, including the causes of adrenal fatigue, while part 2 segues to self-help assessment tools, including a questionnaire designed to help readers determine if they are experiencing adrenal fatigue. Part 3 provides an extensive guide focused on recovery from adrenal fatigue, while part 4 presents a reference section on the role of the adrenal glands.
B-Complex vitamins: Research has found that vitamin B12 deficiency may be associated with stress on the adrenal cortex in some animals. (25) Vitamin B5 is another commonly deficient vitamin in people with adrenal stress. Especially if you’re reducing or eliminating meat from your diet in order to fight adrenal fatigue, it may serve you well to take a high-quality B-complex vitamin supplement.
Because I have a job that’s indoors, I need to make it a point to get outside more often. I believe there is something coded in our DNA that gives each of us an affinity with the sun and fresh air, so that we seek out these health-boosting influences. I also like to practice earthing, or walking barefoot outside, as much as I can to help de-stress. Something about that skin-on-earth connection feels literally grounding and refreshing.
Thank you for sharing your recovery process for your adrenals! This spring I began the journey to find remove things from my diet that irritated my adrenals, causing them to ‘crash’. In my search for healing, I found your article and it’s so encouraging! I do have a few questions though…. is the reason for fat bombs to give the adrenals rest from needing to help create energy (by eating ‘sugar’ multiple times an hour? and after they’re back to normal, the fat bombs won’t be necessary?
Now i’m still currently on some meds but am slowly decreasing. The first things i started out with was eating healthier, fruits, veggies, less processed foods, and using essential oils, (no I’m not a distributor) I buy mine at my local natural food stores, I continued having issues and was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia, and found out that nightshade vegetables which I love and ate plentiful amounts of aggravated it, within a few days of stopping them I felt better, still had a lot of stomach issues, my doc suggested stopping gluten. around this time I also started drinking and making my own kombucha. During this time I’ve been adding more homemade fermented foods such as milk kefir, homemade yogurt, lacto-fermented lemonade, also things like chia, flax and hemp seeds, coconut oil, cocoa, natural salt, and sugar not refined, also canned and fresh fishes, and I even bought liver the other day. Now I’m sure there are others out there who will tell me other things i should do like eliminate all sugars, and other things, but I listen to my body, and I might get there one day, but there is hope, don’t get overwhelmed take it one little step at a time, and most of all listen to your body what works for one person may not work for you, or you might not be ready to do for one reason or another, As for diet there are so many out there, what I do is investigate them all and chose the parts of them that I can do, do I recommend one over another, the best i can say is I have in some ways a restrictive diet, but not super strict, I like meat, I agree we need more plant based foods in our diets, I try to make things I eat/drink nutrient dense, and I go by the 80/20 rule, since non of us are perfect, but when we go off no big deal, go right back to what you were doing, and if needed make some changes. think, Bad, Good, Better, Best, like fruit and veggies, Bad is none, Good is eating them, Better is fresh and mostly veggies, Best would be all organic, and so on.

I have had anxiety/panic attacks for years and recently been through a lot of stress and have developed low blood pressure, dizziness and increased heart rate especially when walking around, and weakness, and sometimes episodes of dizziness where my blood pressure is high. I’m pretty sure this is adrenal insufficiency and I started taking 5,000mg vitamin C and started with 1tsp sole water and multi vitamin, and adrenal response supplement. I also follow a gluten free, soy free, dairy free with the exception of goat cheese. Is there anything else I can do to help?
The adrenal glands secrete over 50 hormones including the metabolic intermediates (known since 1965). The adrenal glands are important glands to keep us balanced. Norepinephrine fight or flight hormones are needed the first part of stress response. Most of adrenal glands regulated by blood flow – HPA Axis and hormones. Most of our hormones are secreted by adrenal glands so if are adrenals are tired and overworked then the hormones may become below normal levels. The sex hormones and the stress hormones need to work together. Blood sugar is important to keep normal during stressful situations. If adrenals are not functioning their best, then we can’t perform as well as we need to. If cortisol is too low or too high, then other hormones may be out of balance- the body is very delicate and has innate intelligence to keep functioning with daily demands of life.
So during my healing journey, I started practicing mindfulness meditation and other strategies to bring mindfulness into my day. Even just taking some time throughout the day to become aware of your breath is a simple way to defuse stress levels and calm your brain-adrenal axis. I'm also a big fan of listening to Eckhart Tolle audiobooks when I'm in the car.

Disclaimer: The information contained on this site is intended for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for advice, diagnosis or treatment by a licensed physician. It is not meant to cover all possible precautions, drug interactions, circumstance or adverse effects. You should seek prompt medical care for any health issues and consult your doctor before using alternative medicine or making a change to your regimen.
The lack of a biological explanation can be disappointing. To make things worse, it’s not unusual for doctors to say “there is nothing wrong with you” or “this is all in your head.” The overwhelming amount of information on the Internet that recommends many types of treatment causes even more stress. Mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety, may have symptoms similar to adrenal fatigue and may not respond well to antidepressants and counseling. And some patients do not believe that a mental health concern is the primary cause of their symptoms and many refuse medications due to concerns about their side effects.
In her book, this Certified Nutrition Specialist presents her central premise that the brain – not the adrenals – bears the most responsibility for what we commonly view as adrenal fatigue. Like Dr. James Wilson, Gedgaudas uses much of Hans Selye’s pioneering research into stress and our response to stressors as a starting point for her work. Unlike Wilson, however, she turns her attention almost completely away from the adrenal glands and toward the patient’s brain. In her view, it is the brain that is most at risk in our modern world, and it is the impact of stress on the brain that is at the root of most of modern man’s fatigue issues.
Another study, released in 2005, found that students diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome had “alterations in adrenal function,” particularly in females, suggesting that their adrenal glands were no longer receiving a normal amount of stimulation. (11) And it’s not just about the amount of sleep you get — researchers at Brandeis University discovered that the quality, rather than the quantity of sleep, affects the body’s normal cortisol responses when exposed to stress. (12)
Carmen there is hope, I was on prednisone for more that 5 years straight, it was a long, awful, painful, and slow withdrawal from it. this was about a year and a half ago, i’ve had to do short bursts about 4 times since then, I like to breathe. At that time I also got off of high doses of morphine another withdrawal that was not pretty, I was put on methadone as i have chronic pain issues. After this time I started investigating herbs that might help me, and i have found a wealth of information on not just herbs, but on many other natural ways to heal, and I’m actually starting to feel better than I can ever remember and I’m 53, with 6 children, 7 grandchildren 3 of which I have been Mom to for the last year and a half.
Nieman recommends taking a careful history and investigating the causes of each symptom or group of symptoms. “I suggest that we work with the patient’s primary-care person to exclude potential disorders such as anemia, obstructive sleep apnea, irritable bowel syndrome, depression or anxiety, diabetes, other systemic illness, poor diet, stress at work or home, or overtraining.”

Hi heather, thank you for all the time and energy you put into your blog. I always enjoy your posts while nursing my little ones to bed. I never leave a comment on anything but this time I had to. We had a very stressful move during my fourth pregnancy and I felt like a different person after that. A friend of mine gave me dr. Wilson’s book and his advice along with taking vitamin c, magnesium, and his own supplement, Adrenal Rebuilder, restored me. It was a very difficult time for me and I am so grateful for that book. I hope get the rest you need but I know how hard it is when your children are young.
Christine R. says…"If you are interested in learning about adrenal fatigue and to find out if you have it, I highly recommend The Adrenal Fatigue Solution by Fawne Hansen and Dr. Eric Wood. It is an excellent, thorough book about this widespread condition that doctors just aren't treating. This book shows you how to heal your adrenal fatigue for good."
Fluids are needed to carry nutrients to the cells, aid digestion and help the kidneys to flush toxins from the body. Fluids also aid the formation of ‘digestive juices’ in the stomach, so we can absorb nutrients from food. Water also regulates our body temperature and metabolism. Most nutritionists recommend drinking at least 6 glasses of fresh, filtered water per day.
Indeed, an article from a São Paulo university was released in 2016 with the title: “Adrenal fatigue does not exist: a systematic review.” According to this review, results of acceptable studies available to them at the time had “conflicting results” and could provide no definitive proof of the disease, nor diagnostic criteria or adrenal fatigue treatment. (4)
It is ordinary for stress to cause cortisol levels to rise in a normal fashion, but in adrenal fatigue the output of cortisol and other adrenal hormones is constantly being stimulated. This overstimulation causes the body’s vitality to dwindle. With each downshift in adrenal function, the body is considerably more affected in a negative fashion: “adrenal fatigue, in all its mild and severe forms, is usually caused by some form of stress…. It is important to know that your adrenals respond to every kind of stress the same, whatever the source” (p 11). Cortisol is a powerful hormone that has a profound effect on every organ and system in the body.
The result is often relentless, debilitating fatigue that is the hallmark of adrenal insufficiency. Though this fatigue is often accompanied by depressed mood, irritability, and loss of interest in life, this doesn’t mean that the adrenal exhaustion is necessarily the cause of the mood change, any more than similar problems are always caused by thyroid malfunction. That is why these emotional symptoms do not always go away with treatment — the underlying issues remain unresolved until they are specifically addressed by behavior and lifestyle changes.
It’s important to emphasize the role of emotional factors. Guilt, pain from past hurts, self-destructive habits, unresolved relationship problems — your past and present emotional experience may serve as an ever-present stressor. Dealing with these problems directly is much more beneficial than trying to compensate for the stress they create, in the same way that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”
The Adrenal Fatigue Solution contains everything you need to start treating your Adrenal Fatigue. We have included lots of information on the lifestyle changes that you should be making, along with complete lists of the vitamins, minerals and supplements that you should be discussing with your doctor. The eBook is written in simple, easy-to-understand terms, and is the perfect starting point for your treatment.
I was experiencing hair loss in huge amounts. My stress was through the roof last few years . My mom passed away of cancer seven months ago. Finally saw an endo Dr and found out my DHEA levels are soaring. My testosterone high. I have Pcos and Dr found a small benign mass on my left adrenal gland. I pretty much feel like crap all the time. Major panic attacks and anxiety, exhaustion, weight gain, stressed, depressed, headaches, body aches, left kidney pain. Now I have fast heart beat and high blood pressure. I’m on Aldactone and couple other meds. I just have severs fear if this small mass since cancer is in my family. The Dr thinks nothing of it as it seems to be build up hormone. I am afraid it will turn into something worse. And my anxiety makes me fear the worst. They are saying my thyroid is fine but I don’t believe that. Any suggestions? Thank you…….
Adaptogens are unusual because they modulate your cortisol in both directions: if your cortisol is low, adaptogens bring it up, and if your cortisol is high, they bring it down. This makes adaptogens particularly valuable for treating adrenal fatigue, where you often deal with both highs and lows. Ashwagandha is my favorite. Be warned, though: ashwagandha is Sanskrit for “smell of horse,” and it lives up to its name — don’t chew it, and get it in capsule form if you can.
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