Standard doctors often dismiss cortisol test results because they fall “within the normal range” of cortisol. But feeling like crap isn’t normal, and you shouldn’t accept it. It’s similar with testosterone: 300 ng/dL is “within the normal range,” and so is 900 ng/dL. But if you triple your testosterone levels, I promise you’ll feel a lot different.

Do you have Adrenal Fatigue? A few changes in your diet and lifestyle can go a long way to getting your energy levels back. You can also use some natural supplements to give your body the support it needs to recover. Dr Eric Wood and I teamed up to write The Adrenal Fatigue Solution, which contains a comprehensive plan to recover from Adrenal Fatigue.
Secondly, this is an EARLY indicator of adrenal fatigue. Pupillary contraction is not nearly as high on the priority list for your adrenals as, say, blood sugar control or blood pressure maintenance. So not doing well on his test doesn’t mean you’re in dire straights and need major intervention. Having reactive hypoglycemia or scoring poorly on a postural hypotension test (blood pressure dropping when you stand up, getting dizzy/tunnel vision when you stand) are better indicators of real hypoadrenia.
Every woman who comes to our clinic with these symptoms gets an adrenal fatigue test, which consists of a series of tests of cortisol levels. And the results — in over thousands of cases — are remarkably consistent: only 1% have cortisol levels indicating healthy adrenal function, while 99% suffer impaired function, ranging from significant adrenal stress to complete adrenal exhaustion.

Just to add to my comment above. After taking Siberian Ginseng for about 8 weeks, I had a break for 2 weeks and started back on it again. Yes, taking it in the afternoon has left me with insomnia for a couple of nights and also an upset/colicky stomach so this is quite powerful stuff. I’m sure it’s brought on my next period a couple of days early too.
In Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome, Dr. Wilson explains not only how stress affects your health but what you can do to un-fatigue your adrenals, protect your health and become more stress hardy. He has written this book in an entertaining, easy-to-follow style that is designed to guide you through everything you need to know about stress, adrenal fatigue and your health. It contains the questionnaire Dr. Wilson developed and used in his practice plus simple self-tests to help you determine if you are experiencing adrenal fatigue and how much it may be affecting you. Dozens of cartoons, illustrations, charts and fascinating case histories from Dr. Wilsons files make this book hard to put down. From beginning to end it will take you step-by-step to reclaim your life from the negative effects of stress.
What's to know about pheochromocytoma? Pheochromocytoma is a rare, potentially life-threatening tumor of the gland in the body that produces adrenalin. In this article, learn about the symptoms of pheochromocytoma and their potential complications, as well as the function and anatomy of the adrenal gland. Read on to find out about outlook with the tumor. Read now
I’m hoping maybe you can unconfuse me. I recently had an adrenal stress index done as well as a full thyroid panel because I’ve experienced all the symptoms you’ve mentioned above and more (headaches, inability to lose baby weight despite trying, etc). I’ve even taken the questionnaire you linked ( and a few others) and they all come back indicating some amount of adrenal fatigue.
The first question to ask is what stage the individual has reached. If he or she is still on Stage 1 or 2 Adrenal Fatigue, where cortisol levels are still high, then a recovery may take very little time. If the condition is caused by temporary stress at work or bereavement, we can reasonably expect cortisol levels to return to normal once the stress has passed. In fact, many of us enter Stage 1 or 2 Adrenal Fatigue multiple times during our lives, only to pass out of it within a few months as the underlying cause disappears.
Many people today have subclinical deficiencies of essential nutrients, like B vitamins, Vitamins A, C and E, Magnesium, Zinc,  and other trace elements.  When under stress, the need for nutrients is even greater. Refined carbohydrates stress the adrenals as well. Diets low in protein may also create deficiencies.   The Standard American Diet is both high in processed carbs and sugar and lower in quality fats and protein and many times lacking in micronutrients.
The idea underlying the condition is that constant stress puts an undue burden on the adrenal glands to produce hormones — especially cortisol — and the glands burn out. The lack of adrenal hormones leads to a host of generalized symptoms, including tiredness, trouble falling asleep or waking up, and a need for stimulants like caffeine to get through the day. With the fast-paced demands of modern life making many people feel consistently stressed out and sleep-deprived, it’s easy to understand the appeal of a diagnosis that promises an explanation — and treatment to counteract their feelings of fatigue.
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