I'm pretty sure we're all walking around with some degree of adrenal fatigue. Long commutes, work deadlines, little sleep—such is modern life! But as a 26-year-old who needs a nap or caffeine to simply function every afternoon (WTF IS WRONG WITH ME?), I was relieved to learn that there is not only a physiological cause for the sudden sluggishness that can sneak up on us at any age, but also a snappy solution to getting back to our optimistic, energetic selves. (You'll have to read the book to fi ...more
I am 29 years old and I have had Gastric Bypass Surgery. I have lost 150 lbs since 2013. I have a lot of they symptoms that are described. I have a hard time getting out of bed, mild depression, brain fog, I get lightheaded when I stand up daily. I do drink a lot of caffeine about 2 energy drinks a day for the past 2 1/2 years. I fee like it is the only thing that can give me the energy to function. lately my blood sugar has been all over the place and I feel like I constantly have to snack in order to maintain feeling normal. I am on a Thyroid medication and my Thyroid is normal with that. My periods have been really off lately, I went to my Gyno who just put me on birth control. I want to see about going to an internal medicine doctor who can help me. because I don’t know what to do to feel better.
To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review made by endocrinologists to examine a possible correlation between the HPA axis and a purported “adrenal fatigue” and other conditions associated with fatigue, exhaustion or burnout. So far, there is no proof or demonstration of the existence of “AF”. While a significant number of the reported studies showed differences between the healthy and fatigued groups, important methodological issues and confounding factors were apparent. Two concluding remarks emerge from this systematic review: (1) the results of previous studies were contradictory using all the methods for assessing fatigue and the HPA axis, and (2) the most appropriate methods to assess the HPA axis were not used to evaluate fatigue. Therefore, “AF” requires further investigation by those who claim for its existence.

A food’s glycemic index (GI) is a calculation of how much each gram of carbohydrate raises your blood glucose level. The glycemic load is an estimation of how much a certain food will raise your blood glucose level after you eat it. High GI foods (GI>70 on the glucose scale) are simple sugars that cause sudden spikes in blood sugar. Low GI foods (GI<55) are usually ‘complex’ carbs that are digested slowly and therefore have less of an effect on blood glucose levels. This means they provide sustained energy for a longer period of time. Low GI foods can include whole grains, beans, lentils and soy products. Include some low GI fruits like berries and green apples.
Wondering if any of you have this happening…my symptoms are worse each month around the same day the 20th. Starts out feeling flu like massive headache, body aches slight fever, nausea. And in 2-3 days it starts to dissipate and then moves to my lower back and nerve like radiating pain in my lower back. Usually lasting 2-3 days, this month it came earlier and lasted longer 6 nights to be exact. Happens like this each month. Today, the Endocrinologist told me it’s not hormones/menopausal. What the heck!!
Stacie Deyglio, ND received her baccalaureate degree in biology with a minor in chemistry from the College of Mt. St. Vincent in New York. Her personal health issues paved the way to discovering naturopathic medicine in 1999. Resonating with the philosophy and principles of naturopathic medicine, Dr. Deyglio graduated from the University of Bridgeport, College of Naturopathic Medicine in 2003. As a medical student, she was involved in student government, fundraising, and the generation of two successful student-run health fairs. Dr. Deyglio’s interests include relating integrative therapeutics to the health of pediatric and geriatric populations. Currently residing in New York, Dr. Deyglio is an avid bookworm and is actively practicing.
While some have viewed this book as being in conflict with Dr. Wilson’s Adrenal Fatigue: the 21st Century Stress Syndrome, it actually complements it. Though they both approach the issue from slightly different perspectives, their fundamental conclusions are equally sound. In fact, many patients rely on both books to gain a more comprehensive and cohesive understanding of why their adrenals are in such a desperate state. Because of that, this book also deserves a place of prominence in your library.
The result is often relentless, debilitating fatigue that is the hallmark of adrenal insufficiency. Though this fatigue is often accompanied by depressed mood, irritability, and loss of interest in life, this doesn’t mean that the adrenal exhaustion is necessarily the cause of the mood change, any more than similar problems are always caused by thyroid malfunction. That is why these emotional symptoms do not always go away with treatment — the underlying issues remain unresolved until they are specifically addressed by behavior and lifestyle changes.
Low adrenal hormone levels may also be linked to low blood sugar. Normally, cortisol works to maintain blood sugar levels throughout the day, but low cortisol levels may not be sufficient to sustain blood glucose. When blood sugar levels drop, sleep is disrupted, which can cause you to wake earlier than normal – for example, between 1-3am. Eating a small, healthy snack before bedtime may help to combat this. Choose foods that are low in sugar and high in protein and/or healthy fats in order to help stabilize blood sugar without spiking it.

There’s no science to back it up. The Endocrine Society, the world's largest organization of endocrinologists (people who research and treat patients with diseases related to glands and hormones), flatly says that adrenal fatigue is not a real disease. And it says the symptoms of adrenal fatigue are so general, they can apply to many diseases or conditions (depression, sleep apnea, fibromyalgia) or stem from everyday life.
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