Unlike other endocrine disorders that are caused by physical damage to parts of the adrenal glands, hypoadrenia is seen by many in the natural health world as a “middle ground” syndrome with simple and easy-to-implement solutions. Currently, no official diagnosis exists for adrenal fatigue and people are either considered to have normal endocrine function or total endocrine failure, like that seen in Cushing’s syndrome or adrenal insufficiency/Addison’s disease. Some postulate that this occurred in the 1950s when doctors over-prescribed adrenal steroids and saw dire consequences, leading to an overcorrection and generalization of endocrine issues. (2)
In his introduction, the author explains how the adrenals were designed to function, and how ideal that function was for the needs of early man. He then points out how ill-suited that design is for the stress-response needs of modern man. That, naturally, leads to a discussion about the failure of modern medicine to account for the obvious prevalence of adrenal-related fatigue in the modern era. As he reminds us, the medical community only officially recognizes problem with the adrenals when those glands are suffering disease. There seems to be an almost conscious refusal to even consider the evidence that strongly supports the contrary view.
Sugar and sweeteners: Includes avoiding high-fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners as well. Avoid sugary foods, cereals, candy, sweets, etc. Be aware that sugar is an additive in many breads, condiments and dressings. Try to avoid as much extra sugar as possible. Seek the benefits of raw honey or stevia as an alternative, and always moderate your use of sweeteners of any kind.

The key message to understand here is that when your body is stressed out and the stress does not go away and it’s not taken over by your relaxation response, then your body is in fight/flight mode and you’ll start to see all of your organs slowly shut down and you’ll experience awful symptoms. I’m talking about your digestion, your immune system and your reproductive organs (I had lots my period for years because of this and the Lyme). Everything is connected folks. That’s key to understanding your body!


What we need to do is give our bodies time, and to understand why our bodies are producing low cortisol. It all comes down to root causes – as it often does in many aspects of our health. When we get a better sense of why our body is reacting the way it is, than we can really approach a solution. Low cortisol output might leave us feeling fatigued, but simply bringing outside cortisol into our systems is not going to solve the problem long-term.

Ive been to the doctor about my depression but i feel as if the doctor doesnt listen to me why I tell her I am tired ALL the time. i feel like im running a marathon just to get through the day. ive been eating healthier and going to the gym 2 to 3 days a week. nothing is helping . Lost 1 pound 🙁 im a horriible napper (i wake up in a bad mood) so i try not to nap . What should my next step be ? im stuck in this rut for now.
Adrenal glands that are in balance produce adequate amounts of hormones to power us through the day. These hormones impact just about every process in the body, from energy production and immune activity to cellular maintenance and repair. They are key regulators of glucose, insulin and inflammation, and play a major role in bone and muscle building, mood and mental focus, stamina, sex drive and sleep cycles.
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I was found to have adrenal fatigue a year ago via salivary 4 point testing — showed low salivary cortisol in the morning and throughout the day – 4, 2, 2, 1. total 9nM). Also mildly elevated DHEA (11 ng/mL). I am doing all the lifestyle/dietary things you list and in the past tried both adaptogenic herbs (Thorne Phytisone) and adrenal glandulars for about 6 months with little improvement. My doctor wants me to try an adaptogen again and I am wondering if either of the formulas you recommended would be worth trying. Thank you for your time.
I think adrenal fatigue is real and could be the symptom of other illnesses. When your cortisol level is low for whatever reasons your blood pressure is bound to be low resulting in lethargy and general weakness. People who complain of tiredness should be checked thoroughly by endocrinologists to ensure that they are not suffering from serious illnesses such as Addison ‘s disease for example.
Have you found that despite trying everything to get some much needed rest and recuperation you still have that 'wired but tired' feeling. You know the one with low-level anxiety at the same time as feeling lethargic and unmotivated? Are you finding it trickier to focus and concentrate on tasks? Are you less motivated about doing things, which you used to love? Has your sex life taken a nose-dive?

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