Very clear, medical explanation of adrenal fatigue and why today's doctors prefer to ignore it (no big pharma money in it). The questionnaire is thorough, and there's an extremely detailed guide to how to recover, especially using diet. I need to read this part again to absorb it properly - it's overwhelming at first. I may return and give this five stars when I'm able to absorb and maybe even implement all the details on how to recover.
The main purpose of your adrenals is to enable your body to deal with stress from every possible source, ranging from injury and disease to work and relationship problems. Adrenal function is of paramount importance because these small glands play a pivotal role in determining the way your body responds to every change in your internal and external environment
any updates? How are you? I am in exactly the same boat as you. Except both ovaries are working. How old are you? Do you have high or low DHEA? Mine is super high. I have hypertension and now I am on blood pressure pills, twice a day. I an not over weight at all, and I eat great and exercise everyday. Except for the last month. I have been too sick, dizzy, to do much of anything but simple housework. No running, no yoga, cant do it. I have super high DHEA. No endo yet, I am trying progestin this week. It is low, I am esto dominant. Keep me posted.
Think about it like this: if your body is a car, and it’s run down and needs to get checked – you are most likely going to carefully drive it to the closest garage. What you are not going to do is race there as fast as you can, because you want to take it easy on your car and not cause it to fall apart before it even reaches the garage. That’s what your body is doing in this case, it is lowering your cortisol level because it does not want your body to be “running on empty.”

When you live in the fight/flight mode all the time and you’re constantly stressed out, you’re setting yourself up for adrenal fatigue because they’ve been in overdrive for a long period of time and they’re been flooding your body with cortisol until they can’t keep up with the constant demand for more stress hormones. Now, your adrenals cannot produce enough stress hormones and/or they’re producing the wrong types of hormones at the incorrect times.


Nutritional Deficiencies are a common cause. When under stress, the need for nutrients is much greater. Carbohydrates, when excessive in the diet, stress the adrenals. Diets low in protein may also create deficiencies. Inadequate or poor quality water affects oxygenation of the tissues. Most diets are low in nutrients required by the adrenals. These include B-complex vitamins, vitamins A, C and E, manganese, zinc, chromium, selenium and other trace elements. The reasons for this begin with how food is grown. Most food is grown on depleted soils. Processing and refining further deplete nutrients. Habits such as eating in the car or while on the run further diminish the value derived from food. Also, allergic reactions to foods such as wheat and dairy products can damage the intestines and reduce the absorption of nutrients.
A Practical Guide To Addison's & Adrenal Fatigue: Advice For Dealing With Addison's/Adrenal Fatigue From A Female Over-Achiever Diagnosed At 31 is the work of Regan J. Heineken, an adrenal fatigue sufferer whose chronicling of her own healing journey became a treatment guide that she decided to share with the world. At fewer than 70 pages, it’s another easily-accessible work on the subject of the adrenals and varying levels of fatigue.

The fallacy of this logic is that there is no evidence that the stress of day-to-day life could have any such effect on the adrenals. “Endocrinologists believe — correctly — that under stress your adrenals work harder and make more cortisol, not less,” says Theodore C. Friedman, MD, PhD, chief of the division of endocrinology, metabolism, and molecular medicine at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles. Friedman says that the patients may be given the diagnosis by naturopaths, chiropractors, functional medicine doctors, and anti-aging doctors.


Toxic chemicals often play a large role in adrenal burnout. Everyone is exposed to thousands of chemicals in the air, the water and the food. Sources may also include dental materials or beauty products, such as shampoo, lotions, make-up.   Cleaning our home with toxic chemicals may also take it’s toll.  Over-the-counter and prescribed medications also add to the body’s toxic load.   Check out these 10 Tips to decrease your exposure. Toxins may also be generated internally due to microbial imbalances in the gut and impaired digestion. When food is not properly digested, it may ferment in the intestines, producing many harmful substances that are absorbed through the intestinal lining. A healthy body has the ability to eliminate many toxins on a daily basis. However, as adrenal weakness develops, the body’s ability to eliminate all toxins decreases. This produces a vicious cycle in which weaker adrenals impairs the elimination of all poisons, which then further weakens the adrenals.

Depending on his or her preference, your doctor may order a saliva, blood or urine test to measure your cortisol. These days it is generally accepted that saliva cortisol testing is the most accurate, as it gives a better estimate of the cortisol levels within your cells, where the hormone reactions are actually taking place. Remember that it is important to be well-hydrated before you do your saliva test – dehydration can skew the results.

I am lucky to have lived now for 12 years with a heart transplant, requiring that I take myriad drugs to suppress my immune system and manage inflammation, as is the normal course. With a suppressed immune system, one is vulnerable to infections and I have been no exception. Every winter I am sick sick sick with colds and bronchial infections verging on pneumonia. But not this year. My PCP wondered if my adrenals had become “lazy” from prednisone doing their work for them. This fall we tried a daily dose of 1,000 mg of B12. The boost of energy was immediately noticeable. Most importantly, I fought off a cold, unheard of for the past 12 years—even during a very stressful period over Christmas in which my husband was suddenly diagnosed with cancer (in remission already!). Despite all the stress of caring for him and being with him in the hospital, exposed to pathogens for weeks during flu season, I remain astonishingly vigorous and well. I would recommend that heart transplant patients and others with suppressed immune systems explore this solution with their clinicians. I am only a short-term case-study of one, but the difference has been astonishing—and right at the moment I needed the wellness to save my husband’s life.
Or, if you cannot afford the book, go to the author's website StopTheThyroidMadness.com and click on the tab "What We've Learned." Pay close attention to the section "Ducks In a Row," which I found particularly helpful. This will help you (1) Identify a physician who is best to treat you, and (2) explain what you need to know going into the appointment. If I would have had this book at the beginning of my health crisis, I would have shaved a year and half off of healing.
Those with adrenal insufficiency may suffer an adrenal crisis if symptoms of adrenal disease are ignored. An adrenal crisis (known sometimes as an Addisonian crisis in those with Addison’s disease) is marked by symptoms like severe, sudden pain in the legs, back or abdomen, severe vomiting/diarrhea, dehydration, low blood pressure and loss of consciousness.
Diagnosis is an important part of the book as well. Because Wilson recognizes that most doctors know little about this syndrome, he provides everything that any fatigue sufferer needs to self-diagnose: a detailed questionnaire to help gauge the level of fatigue and potential causes, advice on the best tests to perform – both at home and in a laboratory setting, a health history timeline that can help you to pinpoint the various stressors that have led to your current condition, and many chapters meticulously detailing his best treatment advice for nursing yourself back to health. An entire section is also devoted to explaining what the patient can expect as he or she slowly recovers from this ailment.
Can’t believe what I just read! ‘Adrenal insufficiency usually means there are long standing life problems’ and ‘because these side effects are not uncomfortable enough to be intolerable’ Is this a joke?! Adrenal insufficiency is a condition, usually autoimmune where the adrenal glands are destroyed. This is in no way because of any life problems! The symptoms of adrenal insufficiency aka Addison’s disease are so severe they greatly alter life and can be life threatening. A person with Addison’s disease needs medicine or they will die from this condition. They are also at risk of an adrenal crisis, this is life threatening and can be brought on by illness or extreme stress. If your adrenal glands are not working properly trust me you will know about it and an ACTH test will clinically prove low levels of cortisol. Please remind me of the tests for adrenal fatigue? Oh that’s right there aren’t any. Just pick a few symptoms out of the 75 listed, many of which contradict themselves greatly. Make sure to ignore any medical tests which have shown you to be in range and just like that you have adrenal fatigue – a condition which has no medical standing, no scientific evidence and was made up by a chiropractor! Let me do you all a favour – none of you have adrenal fatigue. This is a fact

This book is concise and considerate, I felt as though I was sitting with a learned friend who was firmly but persuasively telling me what was going on with my body and mind; as if that were not enough, my dear friend pointed me in the direction of recovery using terminology that was and is readily understood. Thank you David, I know that with the gradual implementation of the things you have recommended I can expect to feel rejuvenated, revitalized and refreshed, journey on!!!!
Adrenal Reset: 7 Days to Restart Energy and Cure Adrenal Fatigue is the 2015 book by Heather Leiman that offers her one-week plan to launch your fatigue recovery plan. It’s one of the shorter books on our list, coming in at only thirty pages. So, if you’re looking for an in-depth, meticulous examination of adrenal fatigue and its various treatment options, this is not the book for you. If, however, you want a concise guide to jumpstarting your recovery plan, with a minimal amount of background exposition, Leiman’s work is exactly what you’re looking for!
While it’d be great if we could get all of our daily nutritional requirements from food alone, it’s rarely possible. The way in which food is grown, stored, processed and cooked destroys much of its nutritional value. Although most whole foods still harbor plenty of health benefits, they may not have enough of the vitamins and minerals you need to recover from adrenal fatigue.
Another study, released in 2005, found that students diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome had “alterations in adrenal function,” particularly in females, suggesting that their adrenal glands were no longer receiving a normal amount of stimulation. (11) And it’s not just about the amount of sleep you get — researchers at Brandeis University discovered that the quality, rather than the quantity of sleep, affects the body’s normal cortisol responses when exposed to stress. (12)
Adrenal glands play a huge role in stress response. Your brain registers a threat, whether emotional, mental or physical. The adrenal medulla releases cortisol and adrenaline hormones to help you react to the threat (the fight-or-flight response), rushing blood to your brain, heart and muscles. The adrenal cortex then releases corticosteroids to dampen processes like digestion, immune system response and other functions not necessary for immediate survival.
No ground is left uncovered in this book, as Dr. Wilson brings all of his experience and knowledge to bear in a Herculean effort to bring some semblance of ordered understanding to what had previously been a chaotic stew of confusing and sometimes contradictory assumptions. Everything is methodically explained, referenced, and indexed so that curious readers can do further research on their own to confirm the author’s premise and findings. He even includes a Glycemic Index table, a glossary of terms, and a host of illustrations scattered throughout the book’s various pages.
Changes occur in your carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, heart and cardiovascular system, and even sex drive. Many other alterations take place at the biochemical and cellular levels in response to and to compensate for the decrease in adrenal hormones that occurs with adrenal fatigue. Your body does its best to make up for under-functioning adrenal glands, but it does so at a price.
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