Carbohydrates: While carbohydrates aren’t all bad for you, the inflammation they can cause is particularly problematic when experiencing adrenal fatigue. Many people crave carb-heavy foods when they’re stressed, which offer a momentary satisfaction but end up taxing the adrenal glands more. If you’re overwhelmed and stressed out, try kicking the gluten and starchy carbs for a period of time to see if that may regulate your tiredness and energy levels.
Sounds similar to symptoms I had been experiencing. I was so debilitated with chest pain, dizziness and shortness of breath, that I was hospitalized. The cardiologist tested me with everything he could think of all kept coming back normal. Finally, he diagnosis me with Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia. A diagnosis by ruling all else out. Just weeks prior I found out my hormone levels are in menopausal range. I was not feeling stressed that was out of the ordinary and this came out of nowhere. I asked the cardiologist if he thought this was due to menopause and he said he did not think so, bet there’s no studies on this but I have researched lots of blogs with similar descriptions. You may want to look into this. Hope this helps.

If you want to see how many people suffer from Adrenal Fatigue, just take a look around you. How many of your friends and family complain of being continually tired or having a weak immune system? You probably know moms or dads who spend long hours at work but don't get any rest at home. You might see other friends drinking several large coffees a day, yet still experiencing almost constant fatigue.
The Adrenal Fatigue Treatment information in this article is a combination of what I learned throughout the last decade of healing Hypothyroidism in my body as well as information from the following Functional/Integrative doctors and their books: Amy Meyer’s M.D.and Aviva Rohm M.D., who I truly admire, believe in and agree with. Click on their name for additional Adrenal Fatigue Treatment information.
Eating right for one’s type of metabolism will help to ensure the proper amounts of sodium and potassium levels as well as raw materials for one’s unique biochemistry. In addition to this, understanding the regulatory effects that the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system has with the endocrine system is also a very important part of the picture.
In addition, a dysfunctional hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and disruptions to your body’s cortisol production can significantly hinder healthy sleep patterns. In the lead-up to adrenal fatigue, elevated cortisol levels will prevent you from falling asleep at night. This hyperactivity can fragment sleep patterns and decreases slow-wave sleep. These disturbances tend to worsen the axis dysfunction, setting up a vicious cycle.
My sleeping and eating habits got worse over time, and suddenly I wasn’t able to handle life’s stresses anymore. Before, I couldn’t really see why this happened, but now it makes a lot of sense. I simply had a series of physical and emotional stressors that were more than my adrenals were capable of handling (mainly because they were not getting the support they needed through rest and a healthy diet).
We now know that HPA axis dysfunction is a more appropriate description of the fatigue that comes with adrenal dysfunction. Shift work has long been associated with increased health risks, including risk of insulin resistance, weight gain, cardiovascular disease and brain dysfunction. Many people do not have a choice but it is not a good idea to consistently lose sleep or upset your body’s circadian rhythm.
Adrenal glands play a huge role in stress response. Your brain registers a threat, whether emotional, mental or physical. The adrenal medulla releases cortisol and adrenaline hormones to help you react to the threat (the fight-or-flight response), rushing blood to your brain, heart and muscles. The adrenal cortex then releases corticosteroids to dampen processes like digestion, immune system response and other functions not necessary for immediate survival.
Adrenal fatigue or hypoadrenia is a pseudoscientific diagnosis believed in alternative medicine to be the state when adrenal glands are exhausted and unable to produce adequate quantities of hormones, primarily the glucocorticoid cortisol, due to chronic stress or infections.[1] Adrenal fatigue should not be confused with a number of actual forms of adrenal dysfunction such as adrenal insufficiency or Addison's disease.[2]

Hi Kim, Overall getting well from adrenal fatigue requires significant changes in diet and lifestyle combined with a good supplement strategy. The supplement strategy is different for each individual as adrenal dysfunction usually follows a continuum that gets progressively worse. So it depends where you fall along that continuum as to what to take.


Adrenal fatigue can be caused by a one-time extreme stress such as a bereavement, or by a prolonged situation such as stress in the workplace. Other factors can also play a role in adrenal fatigue and these include poor diet, insufficient sleep, substance abuse and prolonged situations that leave a person feeling trapped – such as a bad relationship, lack of financial resources and so on. Chronic illness can also reduce the function of the adrenal glands.
Uncontrolled emotions are another cause of adrenal burnout. These include habits of worrying, or becoming angry or afraid. Don’t worry, be happy is a great prescription for adrenal burnout. This applies particularly to high strung, Type A, nervous individuals as they are especially prone to adrenal burnout.  Prayer and meditation release calming neurotransmitters and take the body from a state of fight and flight into the parasympathetic mode of relaxation and can be extremely helpful in healing adrenal fatigue.  In addition, cultivating an attitude of gratitude can do wonders for you adrenals.
Patients can conduct a saliva cortisol test or a urine cortisol test to assess adrenal hormones. This involves collecting four non-invasive samples over the course of one day, from which ZRT is able to generate results with a diurnal cortisol curve. This four-point graph reveals cortisol levels throughout the day and allows health care providers to pinpoint issues with adrenal gland function.
One of the realities of being a pharmacist is that we’re easily accessible. There’s no appointment necessary for consultation and advice at the pharmacy counter. Questions range from “Does this look infected?” (Um, yes) to “What should I do about this chest pain?” to more routine questions about conditions that can easily be self-treated. Pharmacists have an important triage role — advising on conditions that can be safely self-managed, and knowing when medical referrals are necessary or appropriate. Among the most common questions I’ve received in my time working in a retail pharmacy are related to stress and fatigue. Energy levels are down, and patients want advice and solutions. Some want a “quick fix,” believing that the right mix of megadoses of vitamins are all that stand between them and unlimited energy. Others may ask if prescription drugs, herbal supplements, or even caffeine tablets could help. Evaluating vague symptoms is a challenge. Many of us have busy lifestyles, and don’t get the sleep and exercise we need. We may also compromise our diets in the interest of time and convenience. With some simple questions I might make a few basic lifestyle recommendations, talk about the evidence supporting supplements and vitamins, and suggest physician follow-up if symptoms persist. Fatigue and stress may be part of life, but they’re also symptoms of serious medical conditions. But they can be hard to treat because they’re non-specific and may not be easily distinguishable from the fatigue of, well, life.
It is also their job to keep your body’s reactions to stress in balance so that they are appropriate and not harmful or excessive. For example, the protective activity of anti-inflammatory adrenal hormones such as cortisol help to minimize reactions like swelling and inflammation in situations ranging from allergies to autoimmune disorders. These hormones closely modulate many metabolic processes:

Standard doctors often dismiss cortisol test results because they fall “within the normal range” of cortisol. But feeling like crap isn’t normal, and you shouldn’t accept it. It’s similar with testosterone: 300 ng/dL is “within the normal range,” and so is 900 ng/dL. But if you triple your testosterone levels, I promise you’ll feel a lot different.

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