Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on The Bulletproof Forum or the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.
So how widespread is Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome? Some practitioners believe as many as two-thirds of Americans have suffered from some degree of adrenal exhaustion. But while some of us can bounce back relatively quickly from a period of stress or trauma, others find it more difficult. Left untreated, Adrenal Fatigue can gradually worsen until simple everyday tasks become a challenge. That's why it is important to address the cause of your Adrenal Fatigue early, and begin a restorative treatment to rebuild your health, vitality and energy levels.
Adrenals. Ahhhhhhh, how I wish I knew about these guys a decade ago before my doctor put me on steroids in my 20’s, which took away my pain but also destroyed my adrenals!!! It’s taken me over 10 years to build back my adrenals. So much fun. Let me tell you. This has become part of my life so I love learning new ways to heal myself and my adrenals have been anything but easy to heal. They’re tricky and they’re exhausting and you end up feeling depleted, tired and fed up most of the time. When I learned about adrenal fatigue treatment from my Functional/Integrative M.D.’s I was amazed at all the knowledge I found on how I could start to heal these babies, which were KEY for my thyroid health. You’ll never have an optimal thyroid if your adrenals are out of whack. So, let’s talk about what adrenals are and how you can make sure they’re in tip-top shape. As Susan Blum, M.D. (she was my 1st Functional MD) mentions in this article for Well&Good, 8 Signs You Have Adrenal Fatigue, “When there’s severe, chronic stress, the adrenal glands can stay in the ‘on’ position, making extra amounts of these stress hormones.”
Note: The “Past” column refers to the last time you felt well (before your symptoms seemed to noticeably worsen). All your responses in the “Past” column will be about how you felt before that date – it’s helpful to write this date or approximate time down so you don’t forget it. The “Now” column is not necessarily about today, but about how you generally feel now, in this present time frame or since the date you entered for the “Past” column.

Sounds similar to symptoms I had been experiencing. I was so debilitated with chest pain, dizziness and shortness of breath, that I was hospitalized. The cardiologist tested me with everything he could think of all kept coming back normal. Finally, he diagnosis me with Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia. A diagnosis by ruling all else out. Just weeks prior I found out my hormone levels are in menopausal range. I was not feeling stressed that was out of the ordinary and this came out of nowhere. I asked the cardiologist if he thought this was due to menopause and he said he did not think so, bet there’s no studies on this but I have researched lots of blogs with similar descriptions. You may want to look into this. Hope this helps.

If you have tiredness, brain fog, lack of motivation, among other symptoms, you should first have a thorough evaluation with a medical doctor. Anemia, sleep apnea, autoimmune diseases, infections, other hormonal impairments, mental illnesses, heart and lung problems, and kidney and liver diseases are just some among many medical conditions that could cause similar symptoms. If the workup from your medical professional turns out normal and you believe you might have adrenal fatigue, I would recommend you consider a fundamental question: Why would your adrenals be drained? Take a better look at what types of stress might be affecting you. For many, the hectic pace of modern life is to blame.

Like norepinephrine and cortisol, DHEA also improves your ability to recover from episodes of stress and trauma, overwork, temperature extremes, etc. And if a woman is experiencing a decline in libido due to falling testosterone levels, often it is declining DHEA levels that are at the root of the testosterone deficiency, as DHEA is the main ingredient the body uses to manufacture testosterone.


I don’t know someone out there, I’m on the east coast. However have you heard of a company called Inspired Nutrition. I’ve used the Ultimate Monolaurin, Skin defense, Silver Skin and C-A-Y defence and they worked great for my needs. The Ultimate Monolaurin is great product that benefits so many disorders and illnesses. Research Monolaurin on the Internet to see all that it can help. It works really well. It might be a great additive to what your taking. Also email me privately, my sister inlaw is in Seattle and I have a friend who is a chiropractor in CA, they might know of someone your way. Lcole0712@gmail.com. send me exactly where you are, what your looking for and what’s going on and I will run it by both of them. I wish you the best in you journey to Great Health! Lorena
The largest difference between them is that people with adrenal fatigue usually have cortisol levels that fall in “normal” levels but not “optimal,” while adrenal insufficiency patients have cortisol levels consistently outside the normal range. In addition, most conventional doctors would say that stress is not a causative factor in adrenal insufficiency (which is “always caused” by damage from other, unknown sources), which seems unlikely.

This voluminous work on the subject of adrenal fatigue covers the issue like few others. Peppered throughout with the lessons he’s learned from a lifetime spent working with fatigued patients, the book explores the full range of issues related to this debilitating syndrome. He goes out of his way to refute the modern medical consensus that holds that there is no such thing as adrenal fatigue by presenting all of the scientific evidence that supports its existence. More importantly, he offers a sound strategy for addressing the syndrome, utilizing nutrition, supplements, and hormonal support when necessary.

Adrenal fatigue is known as a group of symptoms or syndrome that occur subsequent to the underperformance of the adrenal glands and thus deficient hormone production. Patients with adrenal fatigue may not have any obvious signs of physical illness, but will absolutely experience a general sense of unwellness, tiredness or “gray” feelings. Of note is a feeling like you cannot cope anymore, even with things which would’ve previously not been perceived as particularly stressful.
1- It says repeatedly that salt is good for you and potassium is to be avoided. But salt is toxic. I know this from my own experience. Salt gives me nasty headaches. Charlotte Gerson said that salt promotes cancer. Dr. Albert Schweitzer said the same. So did Dr. Birger Jansson. Dr. Max Gerson put all his patients on salt-free diets and gave them potassium supplements; he said that on this regimen sodium deficiency was rare, and his patients did very well. He c ...more
Note: The “Past” column refers to the last time you felt well (before your symptoms seemed to noticeably worsen). All your responses in the “Past” column will be about how you felt before that date – it’s helpful to write this date or approximate time down so you don’t forget it. The “Now” column is not necessarily about today, but about how you generally feel now, in this present time frame or since the date you entered for the “Past” column.

Oysters are packed with zinc, and having a balanced trace mineral ratio between copper and zinc can help with healthy neurotransmitter function and adaptogen to stress. Increased copper and decreased zinc has been shown to contribute to brain stress and anxiety. Oysters – superfood of the sea – are a great way to achieve this balance to help ease your stress levels.


After that, the focus turns to and remains on the brain. The author spends just the right amount of time discussing the importance of the brain’s various parts on the regulation of adrenal function. Part of her discussion centers on how even small mishaps in the brain’s reaction to stress can lead to dysregulation of the adrenal system, and points out one indisputable fact: that the adrenals simply do what the brain tells them to do. Thus, when the hypothalamus -which is located in the brain - starts the signaling process that ends with the adrenal release of higher levels of cortisol, it is the brain’s stress response initiation that is ultimately responsible for any lingering fatigue or other ill effects.
I suffer with all of these I have fibro,bulging discs, degenerative discs, prolapse, annular tear, carp tunnel, tendonitis, cholesterol levels, folic acid deficiency, panic disorder, fobias, asthma, hypersensitivity to stimuli, ,I have raynauds symptoms, and rheumatoid arthritis getting tests for them they keep saying I don’t have autoimmune illnesses
Within the book’s more than 360 pages, the author covers virtually aspect of this dread ailment. He explains in great detail how the adrenals work in combination with other key systems in the body to maintain homeostasis and ensure sound health. He examines the symptoms that accompany this disorder, as well as how to differentiate normal momentary tiredness from the type of chronic exhaustion these patients must endure.

A start is leading a more holistic lifestyle overall, stay away from processed and refined foods, eat/drink fermented foods, get the sleep you need listen to your body and yourself and not others, there are so many out there that will offer advice much of it contradictory, go slow develop a new life style not just a temporary change. if you have the money go to a holistic or alternative medicine, or a doctor who believes in complementary medicine. beware of those who stand to gain financially from your problems.
There are also a number of recipes designed to improve both your overall nutrition and your energy levels. For most people, however, the real value of this book – as is true with most “Dummies” books – can be found in its usefulness as a reference guide. Within its pages, there are specific sections on every critical vitamin and mineral, all of the major hormones involved in the adrenal cascade, cellular energy production, exercise fundamentals, and even depression.
Any excessive stress can deplete the adrenals, especially when weakened by poor nutrition. Working too much or emotional stress are two common causes. Excessive stimulation, especially for children, is another cause. Fast-paced, high-stress, fear-based lifestyles are a sure prescription for adrenal burnout. Other stressors in cities are noise and electromagnetic pollution. Cell phones, microwave towers and appliances like televisions, microwave ovens and computers give off strong electrical fields.
Testing can be an important part of the process. The patients have often been given saliva tests for cortisol, so Nieman tells her patients that saliva tests are not considered reliable. She explains that the standard test is the corticotropin (ACTH) stimulation test — and that if the adrenal glands can respond to the stimulation by releasing cortisol, it disproves that theory that the glands are burned out.
But if you’re overwhelmed by chronic stress, your adrenals can get burnt out from constantly producing cortisol. The result is adrenal fatigue. Your natural cortisol rhythm becomes irregular — sometimes you produce too much cortisol, sometimes not enough — and you can struggle to make other hormones, like androstenedione (the precursor to testosterone).
×