Stacie Deyglio, ND received her baccalaureate degree in biology with a minor in chemistry from the College of Mt. St. Vincent in New York. Her personal health issues paved the way to discovering naturopathic medicine in 1999. Resonating with the philosophy and principles of naturopathic medicine, Dr. Deyglio graduated from the University of Bridgeport, College of Naturopathic Medicine in 2003. As a medical student, she was involved in student government, fundraising, and the generation of two successful student-run health fairs. Dr. Deyglio’s interests include relating integrative therapeutics to the health of pediatric and geriatric populations. Currently residing in New York, Dr. Deyglio is an avid bookworm and is actively practicing.

2012 phenomenon Acupuncture Alchemy Alternative medicine Ancient astronauts Anthroposophic medicine Applied kinesiology Aquatic ape hypothesis Astrology Adrenal fatigue Bates method Biodynamic agriculture Bloodletting Body memory Catastrophism Chiropractic Chromotherapy Conspiracy theory 9/11 conspiracy theories Chemtrail conspiracy theory Climate change denial Moon landing conspiracy theories Conversion therapy Creation science Crystal healing Cryptozoology Detoxification Colon cleansing Dianetics Doktor Koster's Antigaspills Dowsing Ear candling Electromagnetic hypersensitivity Electronic voice phenomenon Feng shui Flat Earth theory Germ theory denialism Graphology HIV/AIDS denialism Hollow Earth theory Homeopathy Humorism Indigo children Intelligent design Japhetic theory Levitation Lunar effect Lysenkoism Magnet therapy Mediumship Naturopathy Nazi archaeology Nibiru cataclysm Numerology Perpetual motion Orgone Phrenology Polygraph Primal therapy Pseudoarchaeology Pseudohistory Genocide denial Historical negationism Holocaust denial Pseudoscientific metrology Psychohistory Quantum mysticism Recovered-memory therapy Reiki Scientific racism Aryan race Melanin theory Trepanning Ufology Vertebral subluxation Voice stress analysis


At some point in all of our lives we go through a period of feeling tired, run down or exhausted without being able to point to a readily identifiable reason. Whilst such symptoms could be attributed to a variety of factors – some lifestyle related and some related to identifiable medical conditions – some people take the view that a condition known as adrenal fatigue could be an underlying cause, and that this is an issue of increasing importance. Your adrenal glands are fundamental to a healthy body and mind – they produce a variety of key hormones, including those underpinning our “fight or flight” responses. Looking after the adrenal glands, and the wider endocrine support system is, therefore fundamental. This book explains why your adrenal glands and the hormones they produce are so important. The book then gives some analysis of why diet, exercise and stress levels are important in relation to the functioning of the adrenal glands – and what you might be able to do to develop a more robust system – also likely improving your overall general health in the process. The goal of this book is to give you the tools to help you understand the condition, consider whether or not you need to seek medical attention, and set yourself on a path to self-treatment and complete recovery. Even in broader terms, if you have ever felt that you may be somewhat low on energy, then we urge you to read this book, and put its advice into practical, daily use.
In this book, Simpson covers the necessary basics: how the adrenals work, the nature of stress and the stress response, and the fundamentals of adrenal fatigue. This enables readers to learn about what this fatigue is, why it occurs, and how they can recognize it in their own lives. She then provides her remedy for this ailment, which involves dietary changes, supplementation, and important lifestyle alterations designed to decrease the amount of stress in a patient’s life.
The problem is that stimulants tend to lose their effectiveness over time. As chronic stress takes its toll on your endocrine system, each cup of coffee or sugary snack gives you less of an energy boost. Caffeine can prevent you from getting a good sleep too. The more stressed and tired you become, the more stimulants you need. This vicious cycle is how many people unwittingly accelerate their decline into hormonal dysregulation and extreme fatigue.

Loaded with relevant information for any person wanting to know about and heal from adrenal fatigue. There is even a self-assessment in the book to determine if you have AF and to what degree (mild, moderate, severe). This book teaches what AF is, how it occurs and most of all what to do about it. There are also a few case histories, which illustrates how AF can present and that you can recover your health.
Christine R. says…"If you are interested in learning about adrenal fatigue and to find out if you have it, I highly recommend The Adrenal Fatigue Solution by Fawne Hansen and Dr. Eric Wood. It is an excellent, thorough book about this widespread condition that doctors just aren't treating. This book shows you how to heal your adrenal fatigue for good."

A: After ruling out possible endocrine disorders, your endocrinologist can refer you to other specialists, including urologists, cardiologists, rheumatologists, allergists/immunologists and infectious disease physicians. If you’re diagnosed with POTS or another disorder, these specialists will work together to manage your health and develop a targeted treatment plan — putting you on the path to symptom relief.
These small but mighty glands also work with other hormones and systems in what Dr. Wilson calls a "symphony." As he points out, when one part of this symphony drops out, such as what happens after menopause for women and andropause for men, the adrenal glands have to pick up the slack by producing larger amounts of sex hormones. Because of this, Wilson claims, good adrenal gland function is linked to longevity.
Once a diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency has been made, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen may be taken to see if the adrenal glands are diminished in size, reflecting destruction, or enlarged, reflecting infiltration by some independent disease process. The scan also may show signs of calcium deposits, which may indicate previous exposure to tuberculosis. A tuberculin skin test may be used to address the latter possibility.
Or, if you cannot afford the book, go to the author's website StopTheThyroidMadness.com and click on the tab "What We've Learned." Pay close attention to the section "Ducks In a Row," which I found particularly helpful. This will help you (1) Identify a physician who is best to treat you, and (2) explain what you need to know going into the appointment. If I would have had this book at the beginning of my health crisis, I would have shaved a year and half off of healing.
I've been disabled now for almost 10 years, but before that, I worked as an RN, BSN (with a certification in Infection Prevention) for over 30 years. I got my Bachelors in Nursing at a well-known University. Unfortunately, we, as students and as nurses, were indoctrinated with the belief that ONLY WESTERN ALLOPATHIC medicine was valid, and complementary and natural health were quacks. Some are, as well as some Western medicine doctors. It took me many many years to realize that our western medicine's practice of lab and radiological and other testings' means of diagnoses, followed by prescription medication as treatment, dictated by protocols and insurance companies, was doing more harm sometimes than good. I started believing in nutritional and natural means of helping my body heal itself was far better than medications in 2013. However, by that time, I was taking 10 prescription medications twice a day. In the beginning of 2016 I became so fatigued, I would fall back to sleep an hour after I slept 9 hours. I had SEVERE sleep apnea. I went to see an Endocrinologist, and ALL my results for Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison's Disease) were there- undetectable cortisol levels, undetectable epinephrine and norepinephrine in my 24-urine collections and blood tests. However, at the test that is called "The Gold Standard" for Addison's, my cortisol level went up 3 times the baseline after an injection of synthetic meds. So even with all these other abnormal tests and my overwhelming fatigue, I was told I didn't have Addison's and should come back for repeat tests in 6 months. If I sound angry, I am. I found an article on Wikipedia that said if your cortisol level goes up 3 times after that test, it indicates a pituitary or hypothalamus problem. The doctor "didn't think I had those issues". So, if YOU ARE LIKE ME, and you KNOW something is not right with you, and medical doctors ignore you, tell you it's all in your head, or you should just RELAX, READ THIS BOOK and others like it that deal with natural alternative healing. Use common sense in deciding what to try in helping your body recover health, but PLEASE TRY TO HELP YOURSELF and not totally rely on doctors who only give out pills, pills, and more pills. In fact, Dr. Wilson (who is NOT an MD, but is highly trained) writes a very vivid account of what western medicine has degenerated to right now. It is startling, and as an RN who worked in Quality and Risk, I know he is correct. Adrenal Fatigue is an epidemic today in the USA, where we live stressful lives and have stressful jobs. There is a test in the book that has been used to "diagnose" your tendency to have adrenal fatigue. And Dr. Wilson gives step by step actions we can take to "get our lives back", using nutrition, supplements, activities, and other natural remedies. He also tells about a simple saliva test for adrenal insufficiency or fatigue that the medical community refuses to accept. If you are sick and tired of being sick and tired, PLEASE CONSIDER buying and reading this book. If your doctor refuses to believe you are not well, help yourselves. Thank you for putting up with me if you read through this Long Review!!
Fish oil (EPA/DHA): There are a large number of benefits of supplementing with fish oil (or, for people on vegan or other plant-based diets, algal oil). Several of these include counteracting a number of adrenal fatigue-related symptoms and complications, such as diabetes, mental dysfunction, arthritis, immune system function, skin issues, weight gain and anxiety/depression.
If you tend to be dehydrated and don’t get thirsty, know that your body is demonstrating stressed adrenals. Try to rehydrate using an electrolyte solution containing targeted nutrients which will trigger the Sodium-Glucose Cotransport System allowing your body to absorb fluids more readily from the small intestine (water otherwise is reabsorbed in the large intestine). I’m using CellFood, Essential Minerals, sea salt, sodium bicarbonate, and table sugar in water and I have noticed a big difference in how my body is using water. You can also look into an over-the-counter product such as DripDrop.
I am lucky to have lived now for 12 years with a heart transplant, requiring that I take myriad drugs to suppress my immune system and manage inflammation, as is the normal course. With a suppressed immune system, one is vulnerable to infections and I have been no exception. Every winter I am sick sick sick with colds and bronchial infections verging on pneumonia. But not this year. My PCP wondered if my adrenals had become “lazy” from prednisone doing their work for them. This fall we tried a daily dose of 1,000 mg of B12. The boost of energy was immediately noticeable. Most importantly, I fought off a cold, unheard of for the past 12 years—even during a very stressful period over Christmas in which my husband was suddenly diagnosed with cancer (in remission already!). Despite all the stress of caring for him and being with him in the hospital, exposed to pathogens for weeks during flu season, I remain astonishingly vigorous and well. I would recommend that heart transplant patients and others with suppressed immune systems explore this solution with their clinicians. I am only a short-term case-study of one, but the difference has been astonishing—and right at the moment I needed the wellness to save my husband’s life.
To diagnose Adrenal Fatigue correctly requires using a combination of lab testing and feedback from the patient (questionnaires can also play a useful role). On this page I will give a brief summary of the major tests that can be used in an Adrenal Fatigue diagnosis. Dr Wood and I discuss these tests in more detail in The Adrenal Fatigue Solution, along with some revealing tests used by integrative doctors.
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an androgen that is produced by both the adrenal glands and the ovaries. DHEA helps to neutralize cortisol’s immune-suppressant effect, thereby improving resistance to disease. (Cortisol and DHEA are inversely proportional to each other. When one is up, the other goes down.) DHEA also helps to protect and increase bone density, guards cardiovascular health by keeping “bad” cholesterol (LDL) levels under control, provides vitality and energy, sharpens the mind, and helps maintain normal sleep patterns.

Adrenal fatigue shouldn’t be confused with adrenal insufficiency, a legitimate medical condition that can be diagnosed with laboratory tests and has a defined symptomatology. Addison’s disease causes primary adrenal insufficiency and usually has an autoimmune cause, with symptoms appearing when most of the adrenal cortex has been destroyed. Secondary adrenal insufficiency is cause by pituitary disorder that gives insufficient hormonal stimulation to the adrenals. Some liken adrenal fatigue to a milder form of adrenal insufficiency — but there’s no underlying pathology that has been associated with adrenal fatigue.


After that, the focus turns to and remains on the brain. The author spends just the right amount of time discussing the importance of the brain’s various parts on the regulation of adrenal function. Part of her discussion centers on how even small mishaps in the brain’s reaction to stress can lead to dysregulation of the adrenal system, and points out one indisputable fact: that the adrenals simply do what the brain tells them to do. Thus, when the hypothalamus -which is located in the brain - starts the signaling process that ends with the adrenal release of higher levels of cortisol, it is the brain’s stress response initiation that is ultimately responsible for any lingering fatigue or other ill effects.
Did you ever complete additional follow-up articles in addition to this one? I’ve been dealing with similar issues and performed the iris contraction test and experienced non-stop wavering. I reached out to my endocrinologist and she informed me that adrenal fatigue is not a medical diagnose and does not exist int he medical world. I’ve had thyroid tests done and all came back normal, yet I still have symptoms. Thanks!

Another oft-quoted piece of evidence against the existence of adrenal fatigue is Todd B. Nippoldt’s interview with Mayo Clinic, stating essentially the same concerns. (6) Again, it is stated that consistent levels of chronic stress have no effect whatsoever on the adrenals and the only true endocrine disorders are those caused by other diseases and direct damage to the adrenal glands.
This can be extremely fast and effective at treating the symptoms of allergies, asthma, skin problems, arthritis, and other illnesses. However, since many of these type medications contain a hormone that is synthetic and is often 17 times more in strength than what is needed by the body, they may repress and in some cases shut down adrenal function – creating an even larger hormonal inequality than prior to treatment. Additionally, the side effects may be severe, ranging from kidney failure to dizziness and in some cases death. Some of the more common corticosteroids are prednisone (brand names of Cortan, Deltasone, Prednisone). These medications have lots of side effects.
Now i’m still currently on some meds but am slowly decreasing. The first things i started out with was eating healthier, fruits, veggies, less processed foods, and using essential oils, (no I’m not a distributor) I buy mine at my local natural food stores, I continued having issues and was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia, and found out that nightshade vegetables which I love and ate plentiful amounts of aggravated it, within a few days of stopping them I felt better, still had a lot of stomach issues, my doc suggested stopping gluten. around this time I also started drinking and making my own kombucha. During this time I’ve been adding more homemade fermented foods such as milk kefir, homemade yogurt, lacto-fermented lemonade, also things like chia, flax and hemp seeds, coconut oil, cocoa, natural salt, and sugar not refined, also canned and fresh fishes, and I even bought liver the other day. Now I’m sure there are others out there who will tell me other things i should do like eliminate all sugars, and other things, but I listen to my body, and I might get there one day, but there is hope, don’t get overwhelmed take it one little step at a time, and most of all listen to your body what works for one person may not work for you, or you might not be ready to do for one reason or another, As for diet there are so many out there, what I do is investigate them all and chose the parts of them that I can do, do I recommend one over another, the best i can say is I have in some ways a restrictive diet, but not super strict, I like meat, I agree we need more plant based foods in our diets, I try to make things I eat/drink nutrient dense, and I go by the 80/20 rule, since non of us are perfect, but when we go off no big deal, go right back to what you were doing, and if needed make some changes. think, Bad, Good, Better, Best, like fruit and veggies, Bad is none, Good is eating them, Better is fresh and mostly veggies, Best would be all organic, and so on.
Adaptogens are unusual because they modulate your cortisol in both directions: if your cortisol is low, adaptogens bring it up, and if your cortisol is high, they bring it down. This makes adaptogens particularly valuable for treating adrenal fatigue, where you often deal with both highs and lows. Ashwagandha is my favorite. Be warned, though: ashwagandha is Sanskrit for “smell of horse,” and it lives up to its name — don’t chew it, and get it in capsule form if you can.
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